Category Archives: Paintings

12th

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowBrooke Jana, Pussy Hat

RESIST

Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Frank’s

12th Annual Community Juried Show

In a way, RESIST, our 12th Annual Community Juried Show OPENING THIS THURSDAYis a sequel — perhaps an unfortunate one — to last summer’s HOW WOULD YOU SAVE THE WORLD? We do need some saving. Right now.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowChloe Pinero, Pose

But rather than offer ideas for evolution, the 34 artists of RESIST — 16 of them brand-new to our space — are often more closely attuned to the frequency of revolution. They tap into this energy and harness it to power their creativity.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowChloe Pinero, Titi’s House

The results just as easily can be ad hominems or odes to courage:

* We see the many faces of the demagogue who needs exposing (not exposure), painted in a JIM BIGLAN lampoon, spliced together in an ALYSE C. BERNSTEIN collage, made into the stuff of children by LANCE PAWLING and JOSH TODD, as well as…
* The heroes of the Resistence, from WOODLEY WHITE‘s recognizable leaders and CHLOÉ PIÑERO‘s resolute fighters to ALONZO TROY HUMPHREY‘s haunting figures and BOB GORCHOV‘s ultimately triumphant angel.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowChris Vecchio, RESIST #2
But if RESIST were composed merely of perceived good and evil, our show, shackled to this dichotomy, would fail to aspire or inspire. Instead our jury uncovered greater depths.
DAVID R. EVANSON adds four images from his compelling “Strange Fruit” series, which shows racial injustice and resistance in a visual language of his own invention.
BROOKE JANA makes words one of her media, inviting you to spend time inside her intricate constructions.
* Look up to take in HEATHER RAQUEL PHILLIPS and CHIARA NO‘s hangable book, which predicts a banner day for empowerment.
MONK E BURNSWELL dominates the 3D case with a measure of last resort that channels both Duchamp and Cornell.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowDavid R. Evanson, Incarceration

So can RESIST mean something apolitical? Sure it can. It always has. To wit:
ELIZABETH H. “BETTY” MACDONALD‘s cockroachs, the never-say-die warriors from the insect world,
NOA TRAVALIA‘s tangled web of foods we love…though we know we really shouldn’t, and,
CHRIS VECCHIO‘s carved “ohmage,” which returns resistance to its electrical origins.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowDavid R. Evanson, Selma

And we’re not halfway through our show. So even after you experience these works in person, you will have plenty more to discover firsthand.

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowBrooke Jana, BANFIRE

And if you choose to purchase art, you will be doing more than speaking out. You will be speaking up for members of our community. 20% OF ALL SALES benefit two urgently needed nonprofit organizations in our own backyard: the WOMEN’S MEDICAL FUND (womensmedicalfund.organd SUNDAY BREAKFAST RESCUE MISSION (sundaybreakfast.org).

RESIST, 12th Annual Juried ShowLance Pawling, All the King’s Horses

Plus, as is always the case with our OPENING RECEPTIONS, there will be light hors d’oeuvres to nibble…your favorite drinks poured by none other than JODY SWEITZER, our host and curator…tunes playing on the juke…and much, much livelier conversation offline. In addition, a handful of our artists will be singled out with JURY CITATIONS, which we will announce at the Opening, roughly an hour into our party. And don’t pay too close attention to the end time; we’re sure to keep going well past 10:00.

HARD TO RESIST, RIGHT?!?

We look forward to seeing you Thursday evening!

Togo

Togo Travalia
Manager

OFF THE WALL GALLERY at Dirty Frank’s

NE Corner, 13th & Pine Streets, Philadelphia, PA  19107

offthewallgallery@gmail.com

(215) 732-5010 (bar)

(484) 357-6440 (cell)

Philly’s pioneering alternative art space, since 1978.

June 4th to August 4th, 2017

Opening Reception June 8th, 7:00 – 10:00pm

Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Frank’s, 13th and Pine Streets, Philly

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Resist

RESIST, Off the Wall Gallery

RESIST

Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Frank’s

12th Annual Community Juried Show

“I’m pleased to announce that Off the Wall Gallery and our jury have decided to donate a portion of the commission (not your proceeds!) of each sale to support two underfunded nonprofit organizations serving our immediate community:

WOMEN’S MEDICAL FUND (formerly the Greater Philadelphia Women’s Medical Fund)

http://www.womensmedicalfund.org

and

SUNDAY BREAKFAST RESCUE MISSION

http://www.sundaybreakfast.org

While not all of our art is politically motivated, once our show is up the call for social justice and voices against the current administration will be clear. What better way to back up our creative ideas and outspoken voices than the ensure we are expanding the safety net just a little and helping support more neighbors in need?!” – Togo Travalia

June 4th to August 4th, 2017

Opening Reception June 8th, 7:00 – 10:00pm

Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Frank’s, 13th and Pine Streets, Philly

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Progression

Paula Cahill, Progressions

“Progression” New Works by Paula Cahill

Crane Arts Building, through May 26th

In “Progression” we see Paula Cahill return to her “Calligraphy Series” with a playful eye on twenty-first century color, movement, and metaphor. Compositions, often created with one continuous line, meander, change color, move forward, backward, and sometimes off the page. Cahill describes her paintings as a metaphor for progress, a process integral to civilization. The painting experience is immersive for this artist and she wishes her viewers their own moments of immersion and contemplation as they move through the composition.

“Line and calligraphy have served as a record of that which is seen and heard for thousands of years. Opportunities to observe and record movement, edges, or sound with line surround me. By visually following the movements and edges of form and creating a written record, I form the catalysts for my paintings.  Compositions are often created with a single, continuous line that meanders, changes color, moves backward, forward, or connects back to the beginning.  Advancing through the painting process is a contemplative, immersive process and I wish the viewer their own momentary immersion as they progress through the composition. I see the paintings as a metaphor for progression, a process integral to individual lives and civilization as a whole. Every day, I ask myself what it means to use line as a form of artistic expression in the twenty-first century.” Paula Cahill Artist Statement

Hours: Wednesday through Saturday, Noon to 6:00 or by contacting

paulacahill2010@gmail.com for a private appointment.

Second Thursday Reception: May 11th, 6:00 – 9:00pm

Crane Arts Building, 1400 N. American Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122-3803

paulacahill.com

Crane Arts Building Mission:

  • Creating a unique community that encourages and supports artistic production by both emerging and established artists.
  • Assisting the development and growth of Philadelphia’s creative resources, assets, and potential.
  • Creating a unique location for certain creativity-based businesses to thrive alongside the vibrant, Crane Arts community.
  • Providing unique space for the visual and performing arts to showcase events on a local, regional, and national scale.

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Marathon

Drawing Marathon. The Plastic Club

Drawing Marathon, April 23rd, The Plastic Club

Life drawing, portrait drawing and painting, short poses/croquis, still life set-ups, noir lighting, Sunday April 23rd, 10:00am – 10:00pm. $15.00 cash for come and go all day. All proceeds benefit Sunshine Arts, an artist-in-residence outreach program  encouraging neighborhood kids to learn the wonderful worlds of dance. music, literature, and art.

The Plastic Club, 245 S. Camac Street,The Avenue of the Artists, Philadelphia, PA, 19107
215-545-9324

“Since 1897, The Plastic Club has been devoted to the promotion and preservation of the visual (plastic) arts in Philadelphia. The busy gallery schedule offers several annual exhibitions for members and non-members, as well as invited artists in solo and group exhibitions. Members include well-known Philadelphia artists.

The name ” Plastic Club,” suggested by Blanche Dillaye, referred to any work of art unfinished, or in a “plastic” state. The term also refers to the changing and tactile sense of painting and sculpture.

Among the founding members of The Plastic Club were the “Red Rose Girls” — Violet Oakley, Jessie Willcox Smith, and Elizabeth Shippen Green — outstanding artists of their time. The name was given to this group of talented women by their teacher Howard Pyle.”

Sunshine Arts41 Sunshine Road, Upper Darby PA, 19082, 610.352.7968

Ms. Sheila Modglin started Sunshine Arts at 41 Sunshine Road in the summer of 2004. She invited children from the neighborhood to listen to stories as they sat around the fish pond in the front yard. The kids enjoyed helping to water the plants and feed the fish.

Since then the organization has grown significantly. Now, resident artists Mr. Patrick O’Banion, Ms. Kat Lehmer, and Mr. Fen Jeeters teach classes to children of all ages from the community. Classes are scheduled after school during the week and on Saturdays. Regardless of the listed class schedule, children come to Sunshine Arts daily to talk, do crafts or get help with homework. Often, they enjoy Mr. Patrick’s fresh baked bread, homemade soup, cookies, or other wholesome snacks when they visit.

The goal of Sunshine Arts is to enhance the education and personal growth of our future generations. Executive director, Sheila Modglin grew up with a very strong sense of community within her family; “We would do any thing for each other. I want to share the sense of community that I have in my life with all the beautiful people right here surrounding this home. The house itself is a manifestation of living art and was accomplished through hard work from my generous and creative family and friends.”

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GoBabyGo!

gobabygo! murals at UDBuddy’s Reef, acrylic on canvas, 6′ x 6′, Tracey Landmann

The Evolution of Art as a Powerful Resource: The GoBabyGo! University of Delaware Murals

by Tracey Landmann

I am at The Philadelphia Sketch Club tonight to discuss the three-dimensional environments, or “movable murals” I painted for the GoBabyGo! Program, the headquarters of which are the Pediatric Mobility Lab on the University of Delaware’s STAR Campus. These three paintings, however, are only prototypes for their future potential, which is what I am going to write about.  The idea I present is not a new one, exactly, but it is one whose fulfillment is growing increasingly more important as our culture both escalates and deteriorates, wreaking data overload havoc. I believe artists can teach the vulnerable among us to control their reactions to that cacophony.  I only realized the extent of the power art (and its creators) has in the social service sector while I was working on these murals.  I will explain.

GoBabyGo is a program that provides independent physical, and therefore social and developmental, mobility for people whose movement is limited by physical disability. There are two sides to GoBabyGo!, the pediatric part, in which toddlers receive their own battery-powered cars specially adapted to work with their abilities (while combating their disabilities) in their own homes and nearby surroundings, and there is also an portion whereby a harness system, which enables people (adults and children) to traverse pathways in buildings by means of poles bolted into ceiling from which a “harness” (supportive vest) on a pulley hangs. This is also useful in a limited physical setting. My idea was to not only put a colorful patch over the ugly, boring gray of a pediatric rehabilitation setting, but also to enlarge cognitive range with an ‘assistive technology’ that will never lose battery power or enable mobility only with a suspended framework.

What I have done so far has been has been for GBG’s pediatric side: I decided to use the unlimited mobility of imagination to enhance the restricted kind provided by the adapted cars. Theoretically, the paintings would stimulate the previously stationary children, now able to maneuver independent of an adult transporter, to go toward the murals; motivate them to reach out for the new environments (they are intended to hang at tiny person eye level), and wonder what might lie in and beyond them. They could make up stories, play pretend – in other words, imagine any number of things about the amazing new places they would see, and be able to reach. All of the animals in the murals are named and described as to species, but their stories are up to the children.  The kids are not fed pre-fab fiction from a cartoon or toy conglomerate.  My dream for the murals is that their use would both set the program apart from those of its type, giving it an extra “edge” to entice potential funders, and inspire GBG founder/director Dr. Cole Galloway to better address the cognitive development needs of the children he serves. My bigger dreams are that the dozens of chapters of GoBabyGo! world wide, the University of Delaware’s physical therapy team, and especially, the caregivers of mobility-impaired children, will see the value of my ideas and duplicate my actions. I suppose you could say I’m planting an already cultivated field to ripen my own vision, but at least the ensuing harvest is for others. Unfortunately, as far as I know, my seeds have not yet been able to sprout very well.

gobabygo! murals at UDWelcome to the Jungle, acrylic on canvas, 6′ x 6′, Tracey Landmann

Growth will be far more likely when the murals are displayed in a more visible location, exhibited in GBG workshops, shown in the program’s promotional materials, and especially, are used as  the base for  lot more sensory stimulation in GBG’s new lab-to-be. This seems like a very complex plant, I know, but it didn’t begin that way.

At first, I wanted to do this because Cole Galloway had been incredibly supportive of the art program I designed for the Brain Injury Association of Delaware.  I couldn’t do much to show my appreciation, but Cole likes my work, so I decided I would produce some of it (but more kid-friendly) for his Pediatric Mobility Lab. It took me several months to figure out the most effective way to do that; it began when he asked me simply to come in and paint stuff – do whatever I want – but told me they, of course, had no money to make it happen.  I don’t think he realized that painting with skill takes a lot of time and costly materials, and considering my commitment level to both art and to cognitive rehabilitation, I’m not one to slap on paint just for fun in a therapy environment. It needs to be beneficial, and benefit requires a lot of thought. When I finally figured out how I could best add to the program’s impact, I was sure I could convince the Delaware Division of the Arts to fund the project (and I did – in part), which would not only pay for materials for me, but introduce Cole to a new grant source for future GBG creative endeavors.  And so: the mural project started off pretty simply, but soon meant a lot more to me.

The deeper motivations behind the project idea – why I would go to such extremes for GoBabyGo! – came into sharper focus as I designed and painted.  I had a lot of time to think while working.  I realized I wanted to paint the murals because I am very conscious of the disadvantages individuals with disabilities have, and how its members are far more limited if they can’t overcompensate for those deficits and social barrier than if they have the figurative tools to do so.  Even more than the average person, most people with physical and/or mental impairments must be adaptable to the potential scenarios and circumstances that may present themselves in the future. Come to think of it, everyone facing an excess of difficulties in any sense is better off if he or she can consider many options.

A person who is flexible is one who is able to view situations from many different perspectives, as well as capable of applying learned knowledge.  That person needs to organize and prioritize life’s tasks, and be in control of his or her own existence. Flexibility of perception and imagination is vital. Although I can’t magically imbue anyone with wisdom, I am  certain creating three dimensional environments will not only stimulate children to explore physical mobility potential by providing hints of what is ’out there,’ but could conceivably enable anyone to consider the possibilities of ‘out there’ in a broader sense.

My project goals really evolved. In doing the murals for GoBabyGo!,  I set out to address what I felt to be Cole’s needs for his program – making the murals light and portable, creating a background to motivate toddlers to move –  but for the toddlers, whose future life requirements are not the main priority for a physical therapy program created  to lower a few fences for a few years, it turned out I wanted my work to reach much farther.

Right now, we who have the gift of creativity might want to think about examining the goals we have for our artistic power, and reach farther, too. The externally provided routes to resources needed to successfully guide life, always elusive (at best), are growing extremely scarce as those whom society marginalizes are shoved aside, and as their demands to raise their Quality of Life expectations grow more insistent.

Today’s service environment for members of vulnerable populations is bad and getting worse as the fundamentals of democracy. Education and social programs are shriveling, and many are becoming less concerned for their neighbors because their attention is forcibly redirected toward potential danger to their own survival. Now more than ever before, we must work together to strengthen our weakest communities, in order to keep the voting majority able to make the decisions to both maintain social stability and allow for progress.  At present, that so-called majority is being manipulated into attacking itself. The divisions between those with literal and figurative wealth and those who are resource-poor is growing, and the resource-rich – inevitably the ones in positions of power – often spur that growth by steering those of us in the middle in disorienting circles.  We need to fortify ourselves by being aware, and enlightening those in the dark.

gobabygo! murals at UDVincent on Safari, acrylic on canvas, 6′ x 8′, Tracey Landmann

As artists, we despair: we mount protest shows, we join in marches,  we use our art to tell the world of our feelings about) the current state of events BUT WHAT CAN WE DO BESIDES VOICE OUR OWN DISCONTENT?  How can we control any of it? What special quality do we have that can help keep the canyon dividing the Withs from the Withouts from widening?

We can share our self-preservation, our therapy, our own secure base –ART – with the people who see their roads to the future as dead ends. It isn’t an easy fix, but we can help.  Our most significant strength is for the youth; it is much simpler to establish a broad boulevard in an open space than it is to widen a narrow road in an overpopulated city.  We can literally expand environments and alter thought patterns for the juvenile members of disadvantaged groups before mental pathways become set. The self-awareness, ability to balance composition and prioritize focus that our own creativity brings to us can be shared with others in the form of – not just art instruction, but – sensory environments.  We can create worlds in empty spaces – worlds that provoke thought, imagination, and a million different possibilities.  We can bring brightness, light, refreshing sounds, pleasing textures, delicious tastes and aroma, or at least the suggestions of all those, via visual stimulation to people who’ve given up on looking for pathways, or at least never were allowed the malleability of mind required to seek them. Our biggest potential contribution to society is our power to encourage mental agility.

If more of our disenfranchised groups, and especially, more children (who have largely been deprived of creative pursuits, and consequently, ability to foster analytic skill), are encouraged to think outside the boxes those who wish to retain control have created for them, perhaps the artists will be the ones who can kick-start the “Make America Great Again” process.  I don’t see anyone else doing it right now.

Thank you to Tracey Landmann for the content of this post.

Tracey.Landmann.TL@gmail.com

(302) 383-0698

For more information on GoBabyGo!http://sites.udel.edu/gobabygo/

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