Magic

The Art Gallery at Franklin CommonsThe Art Gallery at Franklin Commons is looking for artists & writers to take part in our upcoming exhibition themed, “Romance & Magic” on January 17th. Thank you! Katie Naber, Art Curator for Franklin Commons

A Call for Artists & Writers:

The Art Gallery at Franklin Commons will kickoff the New Year with a “Romance & Magic” Art Exhibition, starting with the Opening Reception on Saturday, January 17th from 1-4pm. This unique exhibition is open to both artists and writers in an effort to support various art forms. An artist may partner with a writer and create separate pieces that relate to one another, OR to create one piece that encompasses both fine art and the written word. Fine artists are welcome to submit their “Romance & Magic” work without partnering with a writer if desired. The exhibition will be accompanied by a musical artist.

For further information, see the Artist Agreement on the Franklin Commons website at: www.franklincommons.net/art-gallery/exhibitions/, or contact fc.curator@gmail.com.

Submission dates are Friday, January 9 (12-5pm) and Saturday, January 10 (9am-1pm).

To stay tuned for future shows:

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Dollar

Dollar General, DoN BrewerDollar General, digital photograph on acrylic, 20” x 24” x 1”, DoN BrewerOff the Wall Gallery at Dirty Franks, Tenth Annual Juried Exhibition

Artist Statement:

“The Dollar General Store that was located at 25th and South Street was a great resource for my community. The low prices helped to serve the folks both rich and poor who stopped in the store for everything from bacon and eggs to cat and dog food. I would see some people counting out pennies to but toilet paper and I saw wealthy people stocking up on laundry detergent. The staff was so friendly, kind and helpful and all of the young people who worked there were African Americans. Over time I learned their names and they knew mine. There was always a line at the cash register and often I would see friends and neighbors. Dollar General stores are usually located in poorer neighborhoods reflecting what my neighborhood of South Street West used to be like.

Since the development of the abandoned Naval Square and the gentrification of South of South Street the Dollar General went out of business and was replaced by a Petco Unleashed store selling high end and very expensive pet food. The corner store that was once a thriving, busy place that employed blacks is now full of dog food and an all white staff, and is now virtually empty of customers. Petco moved into my neighborhood to directly compete with the two existing pet supply stores, The Philly Pack and Doggie Style that sell the same products and offer the same services. The nearest Dollar General is at 26th and Jackson Streets, too far to walk from my neighborhood. The 17 bus goes to Jackson Street but is still a six block walk through a distressed neighborhood.

The photograph printed on Plexiglas is of the metal racks that once lined the sidewalk outside the Dollar General store that received daily deliveries of basic supplies to serve the community. Now Petco Unleashed only serves the wealthiest of dogs and cats.” – DoN Brewer

Dollar General was awarded the ‘mary rowe memorial jury prize, best in show’ for on the Grid Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Franks, Tenth Annual Juried Exhibition. I was elated when Togo read my name. I had just walked from Ionic and Chestnut Streets, I had left the PANMA Holiday Party early because I had a feeling. As I was passing the Philadelphia History Museum a strange thing happened. I stumbled and tore off the sole of my boot off.

It’s strange because I was thinking that at almost the exact same spot and time of year two years ago I tore the sole off another pair of boots while at the museum. Do you know what it’s like to walk with your boot flapping? It sounds like the loudest flip-flop ever, it was embarrassing to walk into Dirty Frank’s with tore boots. But then the whole place was clapping, cheering and saying my name. The experience was awesome, I was so touched by the affection of my friends. When I walked home from Dirty Frank’s that cold night, with my shoe flopping and flapping, I was grinning ear to ear. I’m a part of Philadelphia history, my name is 10th on the list of the Mary Rowe Memorial Jury Prize winners.

Read my review of Photography at on the Grid Off the Wall Gallery at Dirty Franks, Tenth Annual Juried Exhibition on DoNArTNeWs.com

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#onthegrid #dirtyfranks #donniebeat

A photo posted by Louis Dallara (@ldallara) on

Gravy

Northeast Kingdom, Andrew Frost, Gravy Studio

Northeast Kingdom, Andrew Frost, Gravy Studio

Written and Photographed by Laura Storck

On First Friday this month, I was excited to finally visit Gravy Studio, located in Fishtown, which serves as a space that promotes local photographers and their work.  As a photographer with a particular fondness for the darkroom, I was especially interested in attending the opening reception for Northeast Kingdom by Andrew Frost.  Not only does this body of work contain black and white images captured on film, but I felt compelled to learn more about the mystery surrounding his project.

Northeast Kingdom, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

Northeast Kingdom, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

Artist Statement:

“These photographs were made in the Northeast area of the state of Vermont, an area known as the Northeast Kingdom. It’s where my family has lived for more than 200 years. My father joined the Navy when he was a teenager as a way to get out of the rural area, and growing up we never went back, though I always imagined what it was like. Over the past several years, I’ve been traveling there, exploring my past, and making photographs.”

Andrew Frost has been making large format photographs within and surrounding the small town of Groton, Vermont, where his relatives have lived for more that two hundred years. In the late 1970’s, his father left and joined the Navy as a teenager. As Andrew was growing up, his family moved constantly, and he had never personally experienced his heritage in Vermont. He always imagined “a magical place, with mountains, rivers, and lakes, and a land of tree houses and caves — the kind of place where kids were free to ride their bikes to the village store.”

Northeast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy StudioNortheast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

Finally in 2010, he visited his roots for the first time and began photographing the world he had often envisioned. Because of his nomadic upbringing, the Northeast Kingdom held a mythical sense of history for Frost as he had been enamored by the stories of his father’s youth.  On his initial visit to Vermont, he had instantly felt a deep connection and a sense of belonging.  For the next 3 years, Frost had made frequent trips to the area, and brought his 8 x 10 view camera to record and discover his origins on a journey of self-exploration.

Northeast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy StudioNortheast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

Documenting with a view camera was a slow and gradual process, which complimented the way of life in rural Vermont. Some of his subjects are relatives, others are strangers. Frost’s images are beautiful and expressively rich in their black and white tonality. Several of the captures could easily be mistaken as having been made in the distant past – including an image containing elements of a wall photo of a vintage car combined with an antiquated radio, to a photograph of a soldier leaving for boot camp. Before I knew any of the backstory regarding this project, I asked Andrew about the timeline and for details as for when these particular images were captured (as I initially thought that these could have been enlargements made from old negatives).

Northeast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

Andrew Frost explained:

“I don’t know for certain what type of car is in the photo, and as far as I know it’s a clock radio – it’s at my grandmother’s house, and she’s had it for a very long time. The photograph of the soldier, Jeremy, was made the day he left for boot camp. It was the 4th of July in 2011. He’s my aunt’s husband’s sister’s son, and in that area there aren’t a lot of career options. Your choices are mostly limited to farming, ministry, or the military, and he chose to enlist when he finished high school.”

Northeast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew FrostGravy Studio

This poignant collection of work initially evokes feelings of melancholy, isolation, sterility, and stagnation in a pastoral land where time appears to be standing still. Yet these observations will eventually transition the viewer towards feelings of hope, beauty, tenderness, and human connection. The exhalation and inner peace that has resulted in this journey of self-realization and reflection are undoubtedly witnessed when viewing Northeast Kingdom.

Northeast Kingdon, Andrew Frost, Gravy StudioNortheast KingdomAndrew Frost at Gravy Studio is on display through December 31st. Gravy Studio & Gallery, 155 Cecil B. Moore Ave., 2nd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (267) 825-7071, gravy-studio.com, gravy.photo@gmail.com

Andrew Frost was born in Yokosuka, Japan. He has an MFA from Syracuse University, and currently lives in Northern New Jersey where he makes books for Conveyor Arts.

Gravy Studio & Gallery is a collaborative photography workspace and gallery located near the Frankford Arts Corridor.  Serving as a multifunctional space that promotes the work of local photographers, opening receptions are held on the First Friday of every month.

http://www.andrewpfrost.com

http://conveyorarts.org

Written and Photographed by Laura Storck

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Portraits

Portraits at Plastic Club

Portraits at Plastic

Portraits at Plastic at The Plastic Club, 247 South Camac Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107. December 7th – 21st.

Artist Reception and Awards: Sunday, December 7th, 2:00 – 5:00pm

Portraits at Plastic includes work that portrays a person–a likeness or description, including single and double-portraits (portraits of two people together), self-portraits, and abstract portraits.

“A portrait is a painting, photograph, sculpture, or other artistic representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person. For this reason, in photography a portrait is generally not a snapshot, but a composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.” – Wikipedia

Prize Juror: Sarah Stolfa, Fine Art Photographer and Educator, Founder/Executive Director of
Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, MFA Yale University, currently teaching at UPenn.

Sarah Stolfa was born in Winfield, Illinois in 1975.  She earned her BS in photography from Drexel University, Philadelphia, in 2005 and her MFA in Photography from Yale University in 2008.  In 2004, Stolfa won The New York Times Photography Contest for college students and several of her photographs were reproduced in The New York Times Magazine.  In 2006, Stolfa was included in the Second Woodmere Triennial of Contemporary Photography at the Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia.  In the same year, her work was exhibited at Gallery 339 in Philadelphia and Silverstein Photography in New York.  In 2007, Stolfa was included in “Women to Watch” at Moore College of Art, Philadelphia, and in “L’Autre” at the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery of the University of the Arts, Philadelphia.” – Gallery 339

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SPEAKEASY

SPEAKEASY, Sunshine Arts

SPEAKEASY, Sunshine Arts Party and Fundraiser

Buy Early and SAVE 25% click here 

Tickets & Details: December 5, 2014, 7:00pm – 12:00am

Ethical Society of Philadelphia, 1906 South Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia, PA

5 Reasons to Party with Sunshine Arts on the Anniversary of Prohibition’s Repeal.

  1. Booze is legal! Beverages from Philadelphia Brewing Co., Manayunk Brewery, Lagunitas Brewing Company, Samuel Adams, Brooklyn Brewery, Bluecoat Gin, and Southern Wine & Spirits
  2. Delicious Eats! Well-know local chefs and dessert by Classic Cake.
  3. Live Entertainment! Singers, dancers, and a mysterious Houdini.
  4. Gift Baskets! Art and prizes Fine art, gift certificates, 50/50 raffle
  5. Guaranteed Good Time! Buy early discounted $75 tickets, enjoy every minute, and do it for a good cause. You can’t lose!

Tickets are online. Please buy early! click here

21 and Over Only! We love kids and all our events benefit the children in our community, but they cannot always come to our events. So, please, get a babysitter for December 5th and enjoy a night on the town! Thank you. – Sheila Modglin, Executive Director, Sunshine Arts.

SPEAKEASY, Sunshine Arts

Mission Statement
The mission of Sunshine Arts is to provide a safe and nurturing environment for children to explore their creative expression and to assist them in developing tools that enable them to succeed academically and become constructive members of society.

Sunshine Arts
Sunshine Arts is located at 41 Sunshine Road. Ms. Sheila Modglin started Sunshine Arts in the summer of 2004.  She invited children from the neighborhood to listen to stories as they sat around the fish pond in the front yard.  The kids enjoyed helping to water the plants and feed the fish.

Since then the organization has grown significantly. Now, resident artists Mr. Patrick O’Banion and Ms. Kat Lehmer teach classes to children along with visiting artists Ms. Eva Mauchly, Ms. Rita Bauman and Ms. Susan Hinchey and Mr. John Henry Thompson as teachers.  Classes are scheduled after school during the week and on Saturdays.  Regardless of the listed class schedule, children come to Sunshine Arts daily, often enjoying Mr. Patrick’s fresh baked bread or cookies.

The goal of Sunshine Arts is to enhance the education and personal growth of our future generations. Executive director, Sheila Modglin grew up with a very strong sense of community within her family, “We would do any thing for each other. I want to share the sense of community that I have in my life with all the beautiful people right here surrounding this home.  The house itself is a manifestation of living art and was accomplished through hard work from my generous and creative family and friends.” – Sunshine Arts

Sunshine Arts Fundraiser Event on facebook

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