Lambertville

Lambertville Paint OutQuarry Silo, Robert Bohne,

Lambertville Historical Society Paint Out

“I’m wondering whether you can recommend emerging artists in the greater Philly/Bucks County/central Jersey area who may want to participate in Lambertville Historical Society’s plein air event this year?  We like the idea of supporting emerging artists, and also want to keep price points generally below $1,000, which would be consistent with folks looking to gain exposure more than to make a bigger profit.” – Caroline Armstrong

We don’t have a prospectus per say, but here is the basic information below

  • Paint out is on Sunday, October 18th.  In the event of inclement weather, artists can paint another day prior to or following the House Tour.
  • While most work is done in oil, we have accepted pastels, acrylics, water color and this year, even a charcoal drawing.
  • Each artist may submit up to two works. Since the silent auction will be scheduled most likely three months following the paint out, artists are free to finish their work in the studio.
  • Subject matter – anything produced from within or of the City of Lambertville. By way of example: viewsheds, streetscapes, landscapes, farmstead, buildings (though note that straight on views of buildings don’t generate quite so much interest), people, river scenes, canal scenes, skyscapes, the list goes on.  Representational, abstract, all good.
  • No size requirements for the artwork.
  • Submissions must be framed or, if not meant for frames, be ready to hang (I think those with frames tend to do better).
  • Artists set the suggested retail price.  Note that we are very much looking for price points below $1,000 – they sell better.
  • Silent auction takes place in the winter  of 2016 (date still to be determined).
  • Opening bid for all artwork starts at 40% of suggested retail value.
  • Proceeds from the sale of artwork are split 50/50 between the artist and the Lambertville Historical Society.
  • Items that are not sold are returned to the artists.

Some interesting historical facts based on our three years of the plein air fundraiser thus far:  Year One: 23 artists, 35 works, 33 sold, Year Two: 26 artists, 38 works, 37 sold, Year Three: 23 artists, 35 works, 32 sold.

We have a selection committee that meets in late June to finalize the list of participating artists.  In the meantime, to the extent you know folks who would be interested based on the above info, or would like to contact me or have me contact them to discuss this further, that would be absolutely great.

Contact Caroline Armstrongtypeting@comcast.net

Thanks to Ross Mitchell for sharing this opportunity with DoNArTNeWs.

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Five

The Philly Five

The Philly Five

Susan Barnes, Tony Cirineo, Patrick Monaghan, Doris Peltzman, and Reta Sweeney at Medford Memorial Community Center, 21 South Main Street, Medford, NJ, 08055, 609-654-2598. Hours by appointment.

The Philly Five, a group of artists that met over 15 years ago while attending Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia, are exhibiting a diverse selection of oil paintings and other works…Each has a distinctive style and their own preferred subject matter, although they all paint a variety of subjects. – The Medford Sun

The Philly Five, April 10th through May 31st, 2015.

Artist Reception Sunday, April 12, 3:00 – 5:00pm

Fleisher Art Memorial is a source of inspiration, creativity and community. Every year, more than 17,000 people experience the transformative power of art by participating in our studio classes, exhibitions, and community-based programming. Founded in 1898, we are a nonprofit organization committed to advancing the vision of our founder, Samuel S. Fleisher, who believed that art is one of society’s greatest assets and equalizers, and from the doorway of his Graphic Sketch Club, “invited the world to come and learn art.” – Fleisher Art Memorial

Susan Barnes, a native of New Jersey, has been painting in oils actively since the mid 1990’s and is the recipient of numerous awards. Seeking her own educational path at Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia and by attending various workshops, she has learned from a generation of painters that studied under the tutelage of Arthur DeCosta at PAFA.” – Susan Barnes

Patrick Monaghan began his art education at Fleisher Art Memorial School in Philadelphia, PA in 1994.  He received instruction in painting the figure and portraiture from such notable artists as Stanley Bielen, Paul Dusold and Carolyn Pyfrom.  Also, he was instructed in still life painting and continued his education in this genre with Lousie Clement-Hoff, Nathan Rutkowski and Christine La Fuente.” – Patrick Monaghan

“I am a direct painter, painting from life to capture the moment.  The excitement of the moment and the immediacy are what drive me. It is that total impression that creates the completed painting. focus on color, harmony, light, mood, texture, composition and the calligraphy of my brush strokes. I love to experiment with a variety of palettes and surfaces.” – Doris Peltzman

Fleisher Art Memorial creates an environment where over time artists become dear friends, companions, confidantes, supporters and collaborators. I know almost all of the Philly Five from taking painting classes in the early 21st Century. Before they put the elevator in at Fleisher and you had to carry your gear up the stairs and grab a spot with the best views. The instructors or monitors are some of Philadelphia’s most accomplished artists and educators and the classes would fill up fast. The vibe in the classes was as intense as going to PAFA or UArts, critiques can be so painful to watch but so personal to experience.

I distinctly recall seeing Doris Peltzman the first time at Fleisher Art Memorial. She came into the studio wearing a tweed jacket and skirt, a very elegant silhouette, and she proceeded to get oil paint on it. It’s funny but she was so happy to get paint on her clothes. Doris Peltzman‘s been painting with oils ever since, studying with the best, participating in the competitive art scene, exhibiting across the region, and is considered one of Philadelphia’s finest painters.

The Philly Five: Susan Barnes, Tony Cirineo, Patrick Monaghan, Doris Peltzman, and Reta Sweeney at Medford Memorial Community Center, 21 South Main Street, Medford, NJ, 08055. April 10th through May 31st, 2015. Artist Reception Sunday, April 12, 3:00 – 5:00

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Chromography

Chromography, Rowan University Art Gallery CHROMOGRAPHY: WRITING IN COLOR

Translating communication symbols & systems into color, sound and objects Glassboro, NJ – Rowan University Art Gallery presents Chromography: Writing in Color, a two-person exhibition examining concepts of translation and symbol-based communication, from March 23 – May 9. A reception on Thursday, April 9 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. features an artist’s talk beginning at 6:00 p.m. to include a performance of excerpts from musical translations represented in the exhibit.

Artists Melinda Steffy and Gerard Brown explore concepts of translation and symbol-based communication in their work. Starting with different sets of symbols—Steffy with music and Brown with writing—both artists have developed systems for translating distinct methods of communication into visual artworks. Written texts, then, rely on color and pattern to be understood. Music, usually experienced as linear and time-based, can be seen all at once, in immediate spatial configurations. Gerard Brown explores the intersection of seeing and reading, often by employing codes that do not—at first glance—resemble writing. Brown employs a script of nautical signal flags arranged according to traditional “tumbling block” pattern similar to quilting patterns. The tumbling block pattern is a powerful optical illusion that creates the feeling of three-dimensional space on a flat plane. This illusion offers an analog to the ways writing can be confused with speech. Unlike most other forms of writing, signal flags rely on color to communicate their message and are easily confused with one another if color is absent. Converting the common alphabet into a patterned array of color reveals idiosyncratic instances in language, as letterforms repeat and combine into new shapes and arrangements.

Melinda Steffy explores congruent patterns by translating compositions by J.S. Bach and Béla Bartók into watercolor paintings on paper. In her translations, each of the notes of the chromatic scale corresponds with a hue on the color wheel; as the music progresses through the key signatures, the paintings’ color schemes shift. Notes and rhythms are plotted on a grid to show intrinsic tonal and rhythmic structures. The subtle irregularity of the hand-painted squares and watercolor pigments captures a sense of tone variation similar to a live performance.

A central element of this exhibition is “The Hours,” an elaborate experiment in translation that moves messages from writing to music to image. Working with “Solresol,” a language invented by composer and violinist François Sudre (1787 – 1862), the seven notes of the musical scale: DO RE ME FA SO LA TI are used to translate texts. Each word in Solresol uses one to four syllables (or notes), resulting in a lexicon of about 3,000 terms. Sudre constructed dictionaries to translate French, English, and other European tongues into his new language, and created systems of notation – including one that assigns colors to notes – by which it could be written. In this manner, colored flags or lights could transit messages. Brown translated short literary descriptions of times of day into the Solresol language and then into brief melodies that chime at the hours they describe. For example, a passage about the end of the day from Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” becomes a lonely, meandering melody for brass ensemble. Each tune was then re-scored by Steffy, using the system she invented that translates musical notes into color. Several of these visualizations are installed on the gallery windows as decals, and each of them sounds at its designated time in the public space outside the gallery. In the gallery, “The Hours” are presented in the books where the passages originated.

Gerard Brown, a writer and painter, is an Assistant Professor at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. His work explores how the mind moves from seeing to reading by concealing writing in patterns and color. His paintings and drawings have been exhibited at the Woodmere Art Museum, Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia Sculpture Gym, and the Icebox (all in Philadelphia), as well as Finlandia University Art Gallery (Michigan) and 5.4.7 Art Center (Kansas). He has also organized exhibits for the Center for Art in Wood (Philadelphia) and Hicks Art Center at Bucks County Community College.

Melinda Steffy, a visual artist and classically-trained musician from Philadelphia, has had artwork displayed across the Northeast and beyond, including the Icebox, the Hall at the Crane Arts Building, and Sam Quinn Gallery (Philadelphia); Delaware Center for Contemporary Art and Fringe Wilmington (Delaware); Lancaster Museum of Art and Villanova University (Pennsylvania); Finlandia University (Michigan); Micro Museum (New York); and Stamford Art Association (Connecticut). She is an artist member of InLiquid and a LEADERSHIP Philadelphia fellow. An accomplished musician, Steffy currently serves as general manager for the innovative music nonprofit LiveConnections and sings with the Chestnut Street Singers.

Admission to the gallery, talk and reception is free and open to the public. Regular gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10 am to 5 pm (with extended hours on Wednesdays to 7 pm); and Saturday, 12 to 5

Rowan University Art Gallery is located on the lower level of Westby Hall on the university campus, Route 322 in Glassboro, NJ. Directions can be found on the gallery or university websites. For more information, call 856-256-4521 or visit www.rowan.edu/artgallery.

This program is made possible in part with funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

Rowan University Art Gallery

Mary Salvante, Gallery & Exhibitions Program Director

CONTACT: Dennis Dougherty (856) 256-4537

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Paint Out

Whitemarsh Art Center's Plein Air/Paint Out Day

Whitemarsh Art Center‘s Plein Air/Paint Out Day

Saturday, May 16th paint from 8-4. Rain date Sunday, May 17th

Paint anywhere in Whitemarsh, the Morris Arboretum, Maple Acres Farm, Chestnut Hill College or the Borough of Conshohocken.

Up to two entries per person. All mediums are welcome. Ages 18 and up. Cash Prizes!

Member’s $25, Non-Member’s $35

Nancy Bea Miller. Juror: www.nancybeamiller.com

REGISTER @ www.whitemarsharts.org/news-events.html

Facebook Event

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Making Beautiful

Making Beautiful Objects, The Art and Life of Stoney Lamar, John Thornton Films

Stoney Lamar makes beautiful sculptures out of wood and his work is traveling the country in a show called A Sense of Balance. His work can be seen at Philadelphia’s Center for Art in Wood and the Synderman – Works Galleries through April 18, 2015. He talks about his life and career and how Parkinson’s Disease is affecting his work. – John Thornton

“What is true is that no matter how striking, unique and evolutionary Stoney Lamar’s career has been, he arrived at its beginning some decades ago by an entirely different path. He learned his geometrical theory in a pool hall; he aggravated his minister-father; he grappled with a war; he set out in a career direction that he neither liked nor decided he was much good at; he almost by accident discovered what he was good at, at long last feeling the call in his hands and soul.” – excerpt artist statement Stoney Lamar

William Stoney Lamar (b. 1951) has contributed exceptional skill and vision to the world of wood turning for over 25 years. Stoney Lamar’s sculpture is created primarily through a unique approach to multi-axial lathe work, giving his pieces a distinct sense of line and movement unlike other works of turned wood. He lets the shape, color and modeling of the wood determine a piece’s finished appearance and employs paint and metal in his forms. Stoney Lamar is a founder of the American Association of Woodturners, teaches and lectures, and has served on the boards of the American Craft Council, The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, and of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The Center for Art in Wood is proud to present this retrospective, the final venue on the national tour, in our Gerry Lenfest Gallery.” – Center for Art in Wood website

Stoney Lamar: Standing Forms. On view from March 6, 2015 to April 18, 2015. This exhibit is in conjunction with A Sense of Balance: The Sculpture of Stoney Lamar, a solo exhibit traveling throughout the US, which will open at the Center for Art in Wood in mid-February.

Saturday, March 7, 2015 | 2:00 – 4:00 | Tour of Stoney Lomar: Standing Forms at Synderman – Works Galleries, followed by a gallery talk, tour of A Sense of Balance: The Sculpture of Stoney Lamar, and reception at The Center for Art in Wood with Stoney Lamar, Curator Andrew Glasgow, and studio artist and writer Bruce Metcalf. The Center for Art in Wood is located across the street from Synderman – Works Galleries at 141 N. 3rd Street, Philadelphia, PA.” – Synderman – Works Galleries

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