Members

PSC Members 2016, Ken WeinerKen Weiner, acrylic

Philadelphia Sketch Club 2016 Members Exhibition

Approximately 75 Philadelphia Sketch Club members will showcase their talents in the Club’s 2016 Members Art Exhibition from May 13th – June 4th. Artworks will range from traditional media, such as oils and watercolor, to digital media and photography. All works are available for purchase.

A free public reception for the show will be held on Sunday, May 22nd, from 2:00pm to 4:00pm at the Sketch Club.

An exhibition of the works of Priscilla Bell will take place in the Stewart Gallery from May 2 through 30, with a reception on May 22nd, from 2:00pm to 4:00pm at the Sketch Club.

The Philadelphia Sketch Club is a volunteer driven organization, with local artists contributing time and resources toward its mission since 1860. Gallery hours are 1:00pm to 5:00pm Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is free for the general public.

Founded in 1860, the Philadelphia Sketch Club is America’s oldest artists’ club. The mission of the Club is to support and nurture working visual artists, the appreciation of the visual arts, visual arts education, and the historical value of the visual arts community.

Philadelphia Sketch Club 2016 Members Art Exhibition prospectus http://sketchclub.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Member-Show-2016-Prospectus.pdf

Visit www.sketchclub.org.

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Aloft

A View Aloft, John Dowell

Rittenhouse Square, A View Aloft, John Dowell at Griesing Law

Rittenhouse Square – A View Aloft is an art exhibition at Griesing Law, LLC.  This exhibition is the 12th art show at Griesing Law since 2010. The firm is dedicated to supporting the arts in Philadelphia with a rolling schedule of artist showcases all open to the public. The show focuses on images of Rittenhouse Square from very different perspectives than we experience while simply walking or driving by the park and can be viewed high atop one of Philadelphia’s most impressive skyscrapers.

Griesing Law, LLC is all women and they represent many local artists with specialties in all mediums. All proceeds from the sale of art goes directly back to the artists.

This exhibition, Rittenhouse Square – A View Aloft by photographer John Dowell captures more than just a social epicenter of Philadelphia.  Looking through the trees, at the empty early morning benches, groups of people hanging out, and at the reflections in the windows shows a different perspective. John Dowell captures the splendors in the park in moments that make Rittenhouse Square feel like an interior space with four walls of architecture and trees.

http://johndowell.com

A View Aloft, John Dowell

John Dowell

An artist and master-printer for more than four decades. John Dowell’s fine art, prints and photographs have been featured at over 50 exhibitions including at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Boston Museum of Art, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, France. Dowell is a Philadelphia native and Professor Emeritus of Printmaking at the Tyler School of Art at Temple University.

Rittenhouse Square – A View Aloft runs now through August 31st, Monday Through Friday 9:00AM – 5:00PM, 1717 Arch Street, Suite 3630. Anyone can attend for free by appointment by contacting Greising Law http://www.griesinglaw.com

Thank you to Sheryl Raskin, Founder, Out There Creative Media

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Underneath

Underneath, The Life and Art of Gregory Gillespie

John Thornton Films

“A character in a Bruce Springsteen song sings, “Maybe you got a kid, maybe you got a pretty wife, the only thing that I got been bothering me my whole life.” The painter Gregory Gillespie was not that guy. He had a lot in his life including worldly success, loyal friends, a family, and an absolute genius for art. But I do think he also had something that bothered him his whole life.

I met him once when I was a drunken art student and he came to an opening of an important group show of realists that he was in at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. I was in the men’s room, and looked over as I was urinating and there he was standing next to me. I yelled his name, stuck out my hand, and he shook it. He was the nicest famous artist I have ever met.

In 1977 when Gregory was only 40 years old, he had a retrospective at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC. In 2000, age 63, he hung himself.” – John Thornton

Life and career

Gregory Gillespie was born in Roselle Park, New Jersey. After graduating from high school, he became a nondegree student at Cooper Union in New York. In 1959 he married Frances Cohen (1939–1998), who was also an artist, and the following year they moved to San Francisco where Gillespie studied at the San Francisco Art Institute.

In 1962 he received the first of two Fulbright-Hays grants, for travel to Italy to study the work of Masaccio. He lived and worked in Florence for two years, and in Rome for six years, studying the works of such Renaissance masters as Carpaccio, Mantegna, and Carlo Crivelli, who was a particular favorite of Gillespie. During this time he was awarded three Chester Dale Fellowships and a Louis Comfort Tiffany grant. In 1971 he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member, and became a full Academician in 1994.

He had his first solo show in 1966, at the Forum Gallery in New York. In 1970 he returned to the United States, where he settled in Williamsburg, Massachusetts. He exhibited in several Whitney Biennials, and in 1977 the Hirshhorn Museum organized a touring retrospective of his work.

Gregory Gillespie became known for meticulously painted figurative paintings, landscapes, and self portraits, often with a fantastical element. Many of his early works were made by painting over photographs cut from newspapers or magazines, transforming the scenes through photographic collage and by adding imaginary elements. In his later work he abandoned his early fascination with creating hyper-realized realistic imagery, instead focusing on a looser and more expressive style. He often combined media in an unorthodox way to create shrine-like assemblages.

He was found dead in his studio in Belchertown, Massachusetts, apparently a suicide by hanging, on April 26, 2000.” – Wikipedia

Gregory Gillespie, John Thornton Films, Forum GalleryGregory Gillespie, Self Portrait in Blue Hooded Sweatshirt, Forum Gallery

Thank you to John Thornton Films for permission to share this enthralling video.

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Moments

Moments, Eli Smith, 3rd Street GalleryEli Smith, TS sit StiLL, 3rd Street Gallery

Moments, Eli Smith at 3rd Street Gallery

“I want to capture the periods when we break down and lose control; when we become what we fear and even what we hate. In these moments when we become completely vulnerable, we close in on ourselves and wish those outside do not see. My intention is to evoke empathy with what I believe is a common struggle.” – Eli Smith

Eli Smith, Moments, 3rd Street GalleryEli Smith88, 3rd Street Gallery

3rd Street Gallery, 45 North 2nd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106 (215) 625-0993 – Wednesday, March 30 – May 1, 2016, First Friday, April 1, 5-9pm, Artist Reception, Sunday, April 3, 1-4pm

Moments. Eli Smith, 3rd Street GalleryEli Smith, And Again,3rd Street Gallery

“I am a Philadelphia based artist, mostly working in oil paint, as well as gouache and charcoal. Much of my art is monolithic and epic in form and style, adhering to bold imagery. I want the viewer to be unable to ignore my work, I want it to grab them and not let them go until they have noticed it, even if they cannot fully appreciate it. My desire as a painter stems from my inadequacy as a social colleague.” – Eli Smith artist statement excerpt

Contact:

Eli Smith, Philadelphia, PA 19104
eli@elismithart.com
www.elismithart.com
Please contact artist for purchases, commissions, etc.

About 3rd Street Gallery

Since its inception in 1978, 3rd Street Gallery has been an artist-run cooperative in Philadelphia’s Old City neighborhood. The gallery brings together past and new generations of independent artists, who actively create new work for the gallery’s exhibitions. Splitting their time between their studios and the gallery, our member artists volunteer their efforts on the day-to-day business and logistical operations of the gallery that enables our cooperative to adapt to the ever-changing world of art.

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Pop

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of ArtInternational Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Through May 15, 2016

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is presenting a groundbreaking survey of an important movement that explores a global phenomenon that was shaped by artists working in many different countries throughout the world. International Pop features paintings, sculpture, assemblage, installation, printmaking, and film by eighty artists, drawn from public and private collections, and offers an intriguing new look at a subject that is familiar. Viewing Pop Art through a much wider lens, it is sure to delight audiences and broaden their understanding of one of the most significant chapters in the history of contemporary art. This is the first traveling exhibition in the United States to present a comprehensive account of the development of Pop Art during the 1960s and 1970s. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the final venue and the only East Coast presentation.

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Richard HamiltonHers is a Lush Situation, 1958, Richard Hamilton, (Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, UK, Wilson Gift through the Art Fund, 2006)

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, stated: “Pop was one of the most iconic art movements of the second half of the twentieth century. This exhibition is an ambitious effort to explore its emergence and impact far beyond the borders of the United States and Britain. We are delighted that in Philadelphia we are adding to the exhibition some important works from private collections and our own holdings of contemporary art.”

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Ushio ShinoharaOiran, 1968, by Ushio Shinohara (Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo) © Ushio and Noriko Shinohara

Highlights of International Pop include works of major British and American artists presented in juxtaposition with works by artists from other countries that were centers for the development of Pop Art. Hers is a Lush Situation, a work painted in 1957 by one of the seminal figures of this movement, the British artist Richard Hamilton, offers a witty commentary on the advertising adage that sex sells. It treats the forms and shapes of a Buick as an evocation of the human body, punctuated by a cut-out of Sophia Loren’s lips.  Other artists would look at this issue in a different light. In O Beijo (The Kiss) of 1967, for example, the Brazilian Waldemar Cordeiro turns the lips of Bridget Bardot into a mechanized image of a kinetic sculpture, fusing pop culture and emerging computer technology. By contrast, in Ice Cream, the Belgian artist Evelyne Axell paints a woman licking an ice cream cone from a radically feminized perspective, at once quoting and challenging notions of sexual desire.

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Dalila PuzzovioDalila doble plataforma, 1967, by Dalila Puzzovio (Mock Galeria, Buenos Aires)

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Hélio OiticicaBe an Outlaw, Be a Hero (Seja Marginal, seja herói), 1967, by Hélio Oiticica (Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with funds contributed by the Committee on Modern and Contemporary Art)

A key work shown only in Philadelphia is Jasper Johns‘s Flag, 1958, in which the artist represents the iconic image of the American flag in a literal way and at the same time utilizes it as a vehicle for exploring new possibilities for contemporary painting. Other works, such as Antônio Henrique Amarals Homenagem ao Século XX/XXI (20th/21stCentury Tribute), 1967, suggest that such an image could not be separated from the dominance of America as a cultural power in Brazil at this time. Ushio Shinohara‘s Coca-Cola Plan (After Rauschenberg) of 1964 reflects the complex relationship between Japanese artists and their American counterparts, whose work they largely experienced through print media. Also seen only in Philadelphia are Mimmo Rotella’s The Hot Marilyn, 1962—a decollage of an Italian movie poster shredded from wear on the street—and Ed Ruscha’s Felix, 1960, an early example of his work in the idiom of Pop Art, of which he was one of this country’s pioneering figures.

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gerhard RichterWoman Descending the Staircase (Frau die Treppe herabgehend), 1965, by Gerhard Richter (The Art Institute of Chicago; Roy J. and Frances R. Friedman Endowment: Gift of Lannan Foundation) © Gerhard Richter

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, ErróFoodscape, 1964, by Erró, Oil on canvas, (Moderna Museet, Stockholm)

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Joe TilsonLOOK! 1964, by Joe Tilson (Walker Art Center, Minneapolis: Art Center Acquisition Fund, 1966) © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London

Emerging first in the United Kingdom and the United States, Pop Art soon become an international phenomenon, finding expression in a bewildering variety of different forms and media. It was a product of a revolutionary social and political era as well as a response to the proliferation of consumer culture in the decades after World War II and the media—magazines, television, and motion pictures—that fueled its growth. The exhibition gives visitors a rare opportunity to see Pop Art in a new light. It examines the factors that shaped artistic activity in the social democracies of Europe, the military regimes of Latin America, and Japan in the aftermath of U.S. occupation. It includes sections closely examining vital hubs of Pop activity in Great Britain, Brazil, Argentina, Germany, the United States, and Japan. International Pop also brings together works from diverse geographic regions and different periods during the development of the movement to explore common themes and subjects.

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Richard HamiltonEpiphany, 1964-1989, by Richard Hamilton (Collection of Rita Donagh), © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Evelyne AxellIce Cream, 1964, by Evelyne Axell (Collection of Serge Goisse, Belgium)

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Edward RuschaStandard Station, Amarillo, Texas, 1963, by Edward Ruscha (Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire: Gift of James Meeker, class of 1958, in memory of Lee English, Class of 1958, scholar, poet, athlete and friend to all) © Edward Ruscha, courtesy Gagosian Gallery

Among the other artists featured in International Pop are James Rosenquist, Claes Oldenburg, Jim Dine, Rosalyn Drexler, and Andy Warhol (United States); Peter Blake, and Pauline Boty (Great Britain); Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke, and Gerhard Richter (Germany); Keiichi Tanaami, and Genpei Akasegawa (Japan); Antônio Dias (Brazil); and Marta Minujín, Dalila Puzzovio, and Edgardo Costa (Argentina); Sergio Lombardo and Mario Schifano (Italy); and Yves Klein, Niki de Saint Phalle, and Martial Raysse (France).

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Tom WesselmannStill Life #35, 1963, by Tom Wesselmann (Collection of Claire Wesselmann) © Visual Artists and Galleries Assoc., Inc. (VAGA), New York

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Roy LichtensteinLook Mickey, 1961, by Roy Lichtenstein (National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Roy and Dorothy Lichtenstein in Honor of the 50th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art

International Pop, Philadelphia Museum of Art, James RosenquistZone, 1961, by James Rosenquist (Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Edith H. Bell Fund, 1982-9-1) © Visual Artists and Galleries Assoc., Inc. (VAGA), New York

Curator: Erica F. Battle, The John Alchin and Hal Marryatt Associate Curator of Contemporary Art

Support: International Pop is organized by the Walker Art Center. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation, the Prospect Creek Foundation, the Terra Foundation for American Art, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and the Margaret and Angus Wurtele Family Foundation. Additional support is generously provided by Judy Dayton, Lyn De Logi, Marge and Irv Weiser, and Audrey and Zygi Wilf.

In Philadelphia, the exhibition is supported by the Estate of Phyllis T. Ballinger, the Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Annenberg Foundation Fund for Major Exhibitions, The Laura and William C. Buck Endowment for Exhibitions, the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, and the Japan-United States Friendship Commission. Additional generous donors include John Alchin and Hal Marryatt, Mitchell L. and Hilarie L. Morgan, Isabel and Agustín Coppel, Jaimie and David Field, Marsha and Jeffrey Perelman, and Lyn M. Ross.

Corporate support generously provided by RBC Wealth Management.

The Museum gratefully recognizes exhibition media partner Time Out.

Publication: The exhibition is accompanied by a fully-illustrated catalogue. It is the first major survey to chronicle the emergence and development of Pop art from an international perspective, focusing on the period from the 1950s through the early 1970s. Including original texts from a diverse roster of contributors, the catalogue offers important new scholarship on the period. The volume includes some 320 illustrations, including full-color plates of each work in the exhibition, integrating many classics of Pop art with other rarely seen works.  Published by the Walker Art Center, the hardbound 368-page volume is distributed by Distributed Art Publishers.

“Passport to Pop” Public Programs: In Philadelphia, the exhibition will be accompanied by Passport to Pop, a series of public programs including artists’ talks, lectures, panel discussions, and special tours. In addition, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is collaborating with International House, in West Philadelphia, and Ed Halter of Light Industry, New York, to host eight nights of Pop art films from February to May.

Social Media:

Facebook and Twitter: philamuseum

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YouTube: PhilaArtMuseum 

Instagram: @philamuseum

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is Philadelphia’s art museum. We are a landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Thank you to The Philadelphia Museum of Art for the content of this post. Search engine optimization and Photoshop by DoN Brewer.

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