Category Archives: Experience Design

DECOROUS

DECOROUS. Camp, Costello“Decorous exhibition, Installation view #1” Artwork by: Donald E. Camp and Aubrie Costello Ó Amie Potsic 2018

Iconic Philadelphia artists call for social justice and question American identity in

Decorous, the launch exhibition by Amie Potsic Art Advisory.

DECOROUS

Donald E. Camp  |  Aubrie Costello  |  Tom Judd

Curated and Presented by Amie Potsic, CEO & Principal Curator of Amie Potsic Art Advisory, LLC. 
In partnership with Michael Garden Group

July 19 – September 15, 2018

 – EVENTS –

OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, August 16th, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

ADVISORY LAUNCH CELEBRATION & CLOSING RECEPTION: Saturday, September 15th, 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

AMIE POTSIC INTERVIEWED ON ART WATCH RADIO: Wednesday, September 26th, 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM Listen on AM Radio WCHE Live stream at http://wche1520.com/project/art-watch/

Location: Space and Company, 2200 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA

Hours: Monday – Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Evenings and weekends by appointment. Admission is free

Inquiries and information: Amie Potsic, CEO & Principal Curator, Amie Potsic Art Advisory, LLC

amie@amiepotsicartadvisory.com

www.amiepotsic.com

610.731.6312

Presented in partnership with: http://www.michaelgarden.com/

DECOROUS, CAMP Woman Who Writes, Lorene CareyDonald E. Camp, Woman Who Writes/ Lorene Carey, Casein and raw earth pigment on archival rag paper. Photographic Casein Monoprint 22” x 30”, 2006, Ó Donald E. Camp 2006

Philadelphia, PA – Amie Potsic Art Advisory presents Decorous, an exhibition featuring Donald E. Camp, Aubrie Costello, and Tom Judd at Space and Company, located at 2200 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA.  Curated and presented by Amie Potsic, CEO and Principal Curator of Amie Potsic Art Advisory, in partnership with Michael Garden Group, the show is on view now through September 15.  The opening reception will be on Thursday, August 16th from 6:00 – 8:00 PM.  The closing reception and Advisory Launch Celebration will be on Saturday, September 15 from 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM.  Both events are free and open to the public.  Hours are Monday through Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM and by appointment.

Decorous, featuring Donald E. Camp, Aubrie Costello, and Tom Judd, elevates and honors the words, individuals, and histories in our collective unconscious.  The artists’ work melds social justice, politics, human rights, and personal narratives to yield a provocative and layered dialogue.  They give voice to those struggling to be heard, including African-American men, women, and those seeking a better life for their families.  With a distinctly American view on race, activism, and the frontier spirit, these artists invite us to confront and engage in conversation by elevating the every-man/woman to opulence, reverence, and relevance.

Presented at Space and Company, the artwork resonates with the ornate décor of the historic building.  The molding, accents, and chandeliers interact with the rough-around-the-edges aesthetic of the artwork to shed light on the fine line of between high and low culture as well as the line-in-the-sand drawn by class and racial differences.  Depicting those often marginalized as revered portraits and voicing their words in silk slogans alongside suited businessmen in free-fall conjures the possibility that roles can be reversed and identity can be reformed.

DECOROUS, JUDD, Diving figureTom Judd, Memories, 30” x 23”, Lithograph, printed by Ron Wyffels, 2018

Donald E. Camp is an NEA, Pew, and Guggenheim recipient whose work addressing the humanity of all people, including African-American men, has been influential on the national discourse related to race and human rights.  Tom Judd is a Pollock-Krasner awardee whose internationally exhibited paintings, collages, and documentaries have provided a vital American vision from coast to coast for decades.  During this exhibition, Judd also has new public art on view at the University of the Arts.  Aubrie Costello is a sought after silk-graffiti artist whose work speaks of truth and female power by creating interventions in galleries, public spaces, performances, and street art dialogues.  Together, their work embodies the growth, collaboration, and calls for social justice of our times.

Decorous is the launch exhibition presented by Amie Potsic Art Advisory, LLC.  The show celebrates the contributions of accomplished artists in Philadelphia while highlighting the curatorial expertise of the company’s founder. Potsic began the Advisory in January of 2018 in order to fill a void of support for artists, collectors, and institutions while helping them to create lasting artistic legacies.  Seeing a need among artists and collectors to plan for the future and create meaning from their life’s work, she now offers Legacy Planning as well as independent curatorial services and art advising. The closing reception for Decorous on September 15th will also serve as the launch celebration for the Advisory and will feature artist talks, entertainment, light fare, and libations.

DECOROUS, COSTELLO, StayAubrie Costello, Stay, Silk, chiffon, dressmaker pins, thread, 12” x 17”, 2017

Also this September, Potsic will be curating Natural Wonder, a large-scale photography and video exhibition presented through Inliquid at Park Towne Place.  The exhibition will feature Jenny Lynn, Caroline Elizabeth Savage, Keith Sharp, Laura Krasnow, and Leo Hylan.  Park Towne Place, located at 2200 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy in Philadelphia, will offer an opening reception for the exhibition on Thursday, September 20th at 6:00 PM.  Potsic and the artists in the exhibition will be presenting artists talks at the event.

On Wednesday, September 26th from 1:00 – 1:30 PM, Potsic will be interviewed on Art Watch Radio by host Lele Galer.  Potsic will discuss her Advisory and how she supports artists and collectors and provides legacy planning to solidify artistic legacies.  The show can be heard live on WCHE 1520 AM Radio and can be live streamed from their website at http://wche1520.com/project/art-watch/ .

Amie Potsic is the CEO and Principal Curator of Amie Potsic Art Advisory providing visionary and advisory support to artists, collectors, businesses, and institutions with expertise in Legacy Planning.  She is also Chair of the Art In City Hall Artistic Advisory Board to the Office of Arts and Culture of the City of Philadelphia as well as an established photographer and installation artist.  She has held faculty appointments at U.C. Berkeley and the San Francisco Art Institute and has been a guest lecturer at The International Center of Photography and The Delaware Contemporary. She also served as Director of Gallery 339, Director & Curator of the CDP at The Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA), Executive Director and Chief Curator of Main Line Art Center, and curated exhibitions for Philagrafika 2010 and The Philadelphia Museum of Art.

For more information, please contact Amie Potsic at amie@amiepotsicartadvisory.com or 610-731-6312.

Thank you to Amie Potsic for the content of this post.

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Kind

Kind of Blue: Postcard Show, 1241 CARPENTER STUDIOS + ARTSPACE 1241Sarah Watkins Nathan

Kind of Blue: Postcard Show, 1241 CARPENTER STUDIOS + ARTSPACE 1241

July 13, 2018 to July 28, 2018

Some people sing the blues. Some people feel blue. Picasso has a blue period. Blue is one of the three primary color of pigments in painting and traditional color theory, as well as in the RGB color model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. — Wikipedia

ARTIST RECEPTION: Saturday July 14, 4 – 6 PM

PUBLIC HOURS: Fridays + Saturdays 1 – 4 PM

Kind of Blue: Postcard Show, 1241 CARPENTER STUDIOS + ARTSPACE 1241Thom Duffy

Did you know a blue jay’s feathers and a butterfly’s wings aren’t actually blue? Neither are your blue eyes. Pure water is, but only very slightlyFrom the colors we see in flowers and birds, to the hues we use in art and decoration, there’s more than one way to make a rainbow—and it all starts with molecules and structures that are too small to see. –Science Friday

Kind of Blue: Postcard Show, 1241 CARPENTER STUDIOS + ARTSPACE 1241Terri Fridkin

“The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act, which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards “postcards”, so they were known as “souvenir cards” – Wikipedia

Kind of Blue: Postcard Show, 1241 CARPENTER STUDIOS + ARTSPACE 1241DoN Brewer

Miniature painting, also called (16th–17th century) limning, small, finely wrought portrait executed on vellum, prepared card, copper, or ivory. The name is derived from the minium, or red lead, used by the medieval illuminators. Arising from a fusion of the separate traditions of the illuminated manuscript and the medal, miniature painting flourished from the beginning of the 16th century down to the mid-19th century. – Britannica

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Unintended

Unintended Consequences An Interview with Brooke Lanier By Paula Cahill

Unintended Consequences
An Interview with Brooke Lanier by Paula Cahill

Unintended Consequences, May 5 through June 5, 2018

Opening Reception, Saturday, May 5, Noon to 3:00pm

Artist Talk, Tuesday, May 15, 6pm, Brooke Lanier Fine Art, 201 South Camac Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA

PC: I’m excited to see your upcoming exhibition, Unintended Consequences. Can you explain
how the images in Unintended Consequences relate to the landscape historically? 

BL: I see these paintings and photographs as part of a larger art historical lineage that began in
the mid-1800’s and is still very relevant today. For instance, the Impressionists made paintings
that are now seen as merely pretty, colorful, and imbued with beautiful light, but if you look at
their subtext, the diffused light and color were caused by extreme air pollution from the
industrial revolution. Likewise, the landscapes in the show are quite beautiful and serene on the
surface, but they depict the continuing aftermath of industrialization and human impact on the
environment.

PC: How are the artists addressing climate change in Unintended Consequences?

BL: Jennifer Manzellas prints of abandoned industrial building facades along the Delaware and Hudson Rivers are the first images viewers see when they walk into the show. They imply the environmental impact of industrialization. Diane Burko’s photographs from the Arctic Svalbard as well as Greenland’s Ilulissat Glacier and Ekaterina Popova’s watercolors of Skagaströnd, Iceland depict melting ice caps in the polar regions. Moving south, Geoffrey Agrons‘ photographs and my own watercolors depict shorelines destroyed by hurricanes and tropical storms. These are increasingly impactful, intersecting phenomena for densely populated coastal areas that are being developed at the same time that melting polar ice is causing sea levels to rise.

PC: How has climate change impacted your own work?

BL: I was making theoretical and abstract work until this past January when I visited my
grandmother in south Georgia. I had the opportunity to explore the coastline and marshes from southern Georgia to Jacksonville, Florida. Exploring eroded dunes in terrifyingly disorienting fog and tromping as close to the edge of the salt marshes as I could get without sinking in, I witnessed the destruction, change, and extreme erosion that hurricanes and tropical storms have wreaked onto the landscape during recent years.

I began to focus on the environmental impact of these events and the interaction between human destruction of the wetlands and the development of desirable beachfront communities. To accommodate mass development of coastlines, flood plains and wetland areas were paved over, decimating an important source of natural flood control. An ever increasing coastal population means that the impact of the storms on humans is much greater since so many people lose their homes and businesses. After seeing the immense impact of the hurricanes, I came back to Philadelphia and completely changed what I was making.

PC: It sounds like you had a deeply moving response to this experience and that your work
became more personal as well as more focused on social and environmental change.

BL: Yes.

PC: What would you like people to take away from Unintended Consequences?

BL: These images deal with the beauty in the details, but they evoke the sublime: a feeling of
being very small in the face of something very immense and powerful like a storm, the climate,
or how tiny one is compared to a glacier. I hope the viewers will think about their place in the
universe.

*For more information: Brooke Lanier Fine Art or brooke.lanier@gmail.com

Unintended Consequences https://www.facebook.com/events/1480508215410781/

Landscapes are a physical history of events that shaped them. In this exhibition, Geoffrey Agrons, Diane Burko, Brooke Lanier, Jennifer Manzella, and Ekaterina Popova raise questions about what events transpired that shape our current environment. The poetically unpopulated vistas in this exhibition subtly imply the lingering unintentional effects that humans have had on our planet in the wake of industrialization. Rather than being overly clinical or didactic, these images function as personal experiences of global phenomena.

Jennifer Manzella’s prints depict deserted urban landscapes, including vacant lots and derelict industrial buildings along the Hudson and Delaware Rivers. These structures, geometrically simplified silhouettes, have been forgotten in the wake of the decline of the American manufacturing industry. The empty spaces in her compositions are equally important as the vacant buildings.

Similarly, Geoffrey Agrons’ photographs feature mysterious structures such as the bones of piers along coastlines devastated by hurricanes. In much architecture there is an implicit assumption that we have dominion over our surroundings, but nature is unconquerable. Agrons has said that he only points his lens at something that breaks his heart, and indeed, there is a sense of melancholy and being lost in a vast space, trying to make sense of the aftermath.

The coastal areas in Brooke Lanier’s watercolors have been hit by multiple hurricanes in the past two years. Destruction of wetland wildlife habitats for real estate development exacerbates recurrent flooding. As warming oceans and melting glacial ice raise water levels, flooding from tropical storms has an increasingly devastating impact on highly populated coastal areas. Property highly sought after by vacationers and retirees is vulnerable to extreme weather. Carefully landscaped beaches are reshaped by storms and strewn with rubble.

Diane Burko’s photographs give a face to statistics, documenting of the regression of glacial ice. Burko accompanied climatologists to the Arctic Svalbard as well as Greenland’s Ilulissat Glacier to document the shrinking of polar ice over time. Her work contains an inquisitive quality that is also present Ekaterina Popova’s watercolors of Skagaströnd, Iceland. These images serve as visual proof, used for sharing a story once their creators return home.

The show is open to the public Tuesday through Friday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and by appointment. A brunch opening will be held on May 5th from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Join us for coffee, muffins, and conversation with the artists.

Thank you to Paula Cahill for the interview with Brooke Lanier. Extra content copied from the facebook event page.

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Modern Times

Modern Times - Thomas Hart Benton - BurlesqueBurlesque, c. 1922, by Thomas Hart Benton, American, 1889 – 1975. Tempera on panel, 9 1/2x 12 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Edward Suckle, M.D., 2002-91-1. © T. H. Benton and R. P. Benton Testamentary Trusts / UMB Bank Trustee / Licensed by VAGA, New York.

Modern Times: American Art 1910-1950, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Exhibition dates: April 18—September 3, 2018

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is presenting an exhibition exploring the creative responses of American artists to the rapid pace of change that occurred in this country during the early decades of the twentieth century. Modern Times: American Art 1910–1950 examines the new and dynamic visual language that emerged during this period and had a dramatic impact on painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, architecture, and the decorative arts. These developments were shaped by the dizzying transformations then occurring in every aspect of life, from the advent of the automobile and moving pictures to the rapid growth of American cities and the wrenching economic change brought on by the advent of the Great Depression after a decade of unprecedented prosperity. The exhibition features important works by those artists—Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, and John Marin, among them—championed by the great photographer and gallerist Alfred Stieglitz, as well as many other notable figures of this period. Modern Times is drawn almost entirely from the Museum’s renowned collection, especially the gift from the Stieglitz Collection that it received in the late 1940s, and contains 156 works, several of which will be on view for the first time.

Modern Times, Alexander Calder, Portrait of Carl ZigrosserPortrait of Carl Zigrosser (1891 – 1975), c. 1928, by Alexander Calder, American, 1898 – 1976. wire, 14 x 10 1/2 x 10 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund from the Carl and Laura Zigrosser Collection, 1980-3-141. © Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Timothy Rub, the Museum’s George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer, stated: “America’s embrace of modern life—its perils as well as its promise—in the early twentieth century was expressed most clearly in the arts. The work of this period still feels fresh and of the moment. This exhibition provides us with a welcome opportunity to reassess the Museum’s exceptionally rich holdings of modern American art and how we may display them to full advantage in the future when the Museum completes its expansion under its Master Plan. It also holds the promise of many surprises and discoveries for our visitors.”

Modern Times, Stuart Davis, Something on the Eight BallSomething on the Eight Ball, 1953-1954, by Stuart Davis, American, 1892 – 1964. Oil on canvas, 56 × 45 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Adele Haas Turner and Beatrice Pastorius Turner Memorial Fund, 1954-30-1. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York.

While the Museum has presented a number of exhibitions devoted to this subject over the years, Modern Times is the largest and most comprehensive since it presented the collection of Alfred Stieglitz in 1944. The exhibition opens with the achievements of some of the leading figures of “The Eight,” including John Sloan and George Bellows, who recorded the changing urban scene with a gritty realism as horse carts gave way to motor vehicles on city streets.

Modern Times, Beauford Delaney, Portrait of James BaldwinPortrait of James Baldwin, 1945, by Beauford Delaney, American (active Paris), 1901 – 1979. Oil on canvas, 22 x 18 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: 125th Anniversary Acquisition. Purchased with funds contributed by The Daniel W. Dietrich Foundation in memory of Joseph C. Bailey and with a grant from The Judith Rothschild Foundation, 1998-3-1

The exhibition emphasizes those artists—among them Charles Demuth, Morton Schamberg, Charles Sheeler, Benton Spruance, and Paul Strand—who responded to the Armory Show of 1913 and the influence of the European avant garde by seeking to give modernism an authentic American voice. Offering a broader perspective on American art of this period, the exhibition explores the achievements of important African American figures, such as Aaron Douglas, William Edmondson, Horace Pippin and Dox Thrash. It also looks at cross-currents within the arts, including contemporary fashion and design, and work by female artists such as O’Keeffe, Florine Stettheimer, Frances Simpson Stevens, Kay Sage, and Dorothea Tanning.

Modern Times, Charles Demuth, Lancaster (In the Province No. 2)Lancaster (In the Province No. 2), 1920, by Charles Demuth, American, 1883 – 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 x 16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950-5-1.

One section of the exhibition takes a close look at the many artists who explored in their work the abstract qualities of rhythm, light, and sound. Some of their aesthetic strategies were employed to create dynamic still lifes, enlivening what was commonly considered a static genre. Another section explores the expressive use of color, focusing on Arthur Beecher Carles, Henry Breckenridge, and Henry McCarter who stretched the boundaries of artistic tradition by relieving color of its purely descriptive function. These three artists, each of whom lived and worked in Philadelphia, reflected this city’s active engagement with progressive trends in American art. In fact, the significant role that Philadelphia played in the history of American modernism is echoed throughout the exhibition. It includes works by Philadelphia-born artists such as Man Ray and Alexander Calder who became prominent abroad, where they were closely aligned with modern movements in Europe, and others who remained in the city in which the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts provided a center of energy and a place to teach.

Modern Times, Aaron Doulgas, Birds in FlightBirds in Flight, c. 1927-1929, by Aaron Douglas, American, 1899 – 1979. Oil on canvas, 16 1/4 x 14 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest in honor of Anne d’Harnoncourt, 2015-7-1. © Heirs of Aaron Douglas / Licensed by VAGA, New York

Modern Times, Arthur Dove, Chinese MusicChinese Music, 1923, by Arthur Dove, American, 1880 -1946. Oil and metallic paint on panel, 21 11/16 x 18 1/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-2.

Landscape painting was, likewise, revolutionized by the artists of this generation, who found in this traditional genre a sustained source of inspiration. The adaptation of the modernist vision to one of the most enduring themes in American art can be seen most dramatically in works by O’Keeffe, Hartley, and Arthur Dove. Others, such as Sheeler, took the stark, yet impressive geometry of the new industrial landscape as a point of departureThe exhibition also examines another familiar subject, the human figure, which proved to be of abiding interest to the artists of this generation. Included in this rich and fascinating section is a group of portraits by artists such as Milton Avery, Beauford Delaney, and John Graham.

Modern Times, Wharton Esherick, Of a Great CityOf a Great City, 1923, by Wharton H. Esherick, American, 1887 – 1970. Wood engraving, image: 9 15/16 x 6 5/16 inches, sheet: 11 7/16 x 7 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund from the Carl and Laura Zigrosser Collection, 1979-12-11.

Modern Times, Marsden Hartley, Painting No 4 (Black Horse)Painting No. 4 (A Black Horse), 1915, by Marsden Hartley, American, 1877 -1943. Oil on canvas, 39 1/4 x 31 5/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-8

Jessica Todd Smith, The Susan Gray Detweiler Curator of American Art, and Manager, Center for American Art, who organized the exhibition, said: “Modernism changed the way people saw the world around them. Artists pushed their work in new directions, embracing abstraction, while retaining connections to artistic traditions. This exhibition focuses on interrelationships among works of art rather than a single linear narrative. In fact, it gives voice to multiple narratives because the evolution and experimentation in the art of this period is especially fluid. This stylistic pluralism, the beautiful chaos of innovation, was a hallmark of the modern American movement.”

 Modern Times, Alice Neel, Portrait of John with HatPortrait of John with Hat, 1935, by Alice Neel, American, 1900 – 1984. Oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 21 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of the estate of Arthur M. Bullowa, 1993-119-2.

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, Red and Orange StreakRed and Orange Streak, 1919, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 27 x 23 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987-70-3.

Publication

The exhibition is accompanied by a new publication, American Modernism: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Jessica Todd Smith. It is published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press ( 272 pp.) The title of the essay, “Seeing Takes Time” is inspired by a quotation of Georgia O’Keeffe: “Nobody sees a flower—really—it is so small—we haven’t time—and to see takes time . . . “

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, Red Hills and BonesRed Hills and Bones, 1943, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 40 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-109.

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, From the Lake No. 3From the Lake No. 3, 1924, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987-70-2.

With 120 color and 10 black-and-white illustrations, American Modernism is the first book to showcase this outstanding aspect of the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which was one of the first major museums in this country to acquire what we now call American Modernism. It tells a story that is unique to the Museum, examining the collection’s development since the 1920s and the role that the city of Philadelphia played in promoting modernism in the first half of the twentieth century. While previous publications have focused on European and American modernism, this one considers what it meant to be American and to be modern, exploring how these artists challenged convention without abandoning recognizable elements from the world around them.

Modern Times, Horace Pippin, The GetawayThe Getaway, 1939, by Horace Pippin, American, 1888 – 1946. Oil on canvas, 24 5/8 x 36 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich II, 2016-3-3.

Modern Times, Man Ray, A.D. 1914A.D. 1914, 1914, by May Ray, American, 1890 – 1976. Oil on canvas, 36 7/8 x 69 3/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1944-90-1.

In addition to focusing on internationally acclaimed artists from the circle of photographer and gallerist Alfred Stieglitz, including Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Charles Sheeler, Smith also considers those who contributed significantly to the art of the United States during their day but have been left outside the mainstream of art history, whether due to their race, gender, or social standing.

Modern Times, Charles Sheeler, Pertaining to Yachts and YachtingPertaining to Yachts and Yachting, 1922, by Charles Sheeler, American, 1883 – 1965. Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 1/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Margaretta S. Hinchman, 1955-96-9.

American Modernism: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art is now available online via philamuseum.org or in the Museum Store (paper-over-board, $35).

Modern Times, John Sloan, Sixth Avenue and Thirtieth StreetSixth Avenue and Thirtieth Street, 1907, by John Sloan, American, 1871 – 1951. Oil on canvas, 24 1/4 x 32 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Meyer P. Potamkin and Vivian O. Potamkin, 2000. 1964-116-5.

Modern Times, John Sloan, The White WayThe White Way, c. 1926, by John Sloan, American, 1871 – 1951. Oil on canvas, 30 1/8 x 32 1/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. Cyrus McCormick, 1946-10-2.

Exhibition Location

Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, first floor

 Modern Times, Alfred Stieglitz, The City of AmbitionThe City of Ambition, 1910 (negative); c. 1930 (print), by Alfred Stieglitz, American, 1871 – 1944. Gelatin silver print, image/sheet/mount: 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-47.

Modern Times, Paul Strand, The Court, New YorkThe Court, New York, 1924 (negative); 1960s (print), by Paul Strand, American, 1890 – 1976. Gelatin silver print, image (sight): 9 1/2 x 7 7/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Paul Strand Retrospective Collection, 1915 – 1975, gift of the estate of Paul Strand, 1980-21-42.

Support

This exhibition has been made possible by The Pew Charitable Trusts, The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts, The Annenberg Foundation Fund for Major Exhibitions, The Kathleen C. and John J. F. Sherrerd Fund for Exhibitions, Lyn M. Ross, Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest, The Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Exhibition Fund, The Laura and William C. Buck Endowment for Exhibitions, Leslie Miller and Richard Worley, and two anonymous donors.

Modern Times, Florine Stettheimer, Spring Sale at Bendel'sModern Times, Dox Thrash, DemolitionDemolition, c. 1944, by Dox Thrash, American, 1893 – 1965. Oil on canvas board, 26 x 20 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Katharine Levin Farrell Fund, 2002-97-1.

Exhibition-related education programming was generously supported by the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Social Media
Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/Tumblr/YouTube: @philamuseum

We are Philadelphia’s art museum. A landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Modern Times, Lloyd Ullberg, PSFS Building, PhiladelphiaPSFS Building, Philadelphia, c.1932 – 1933, by Lloyd Ullberg, American, 1904-1996. Gelatin silver print, image and sheet:10 x 7 3/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund, 1999-121-3.

Modern Times, Artist-maker unknown, Cocktail Shaker with HandleCocktail Shaker with Handle, c.1930s, Artist/maker unknown, American. Chromium, Bakelite, 12 x 6 3/4 x 4 1/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Martina Schaap Yamin, 2013-28-66a,b.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is located on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street. For general information, call 215-763-8100.

Thank you to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the content of this post. Click the images for large pictures.

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Chester County Studio Tour

Chester County Studio Tour

The annual Chester County Studio Tour is May 19th and 20th. This event has become a favorite among art patrons and this year will be no different. We’re hosting 64 local studios with 154 artists exhibiting their art.

Chester and Montgomery County Studio Tours invites friends, families, art enthusiasts and the curious to experience and meet a variety of outstanding artists as they exhibit their work during these two-day events in May and June. This unique and intimate opportunity gives the visitor FREE, unlimited access to the artists and a clearer understanding of their stories and creative processes.

Meet this year’s Chester County artists. May 19th and 20th

Visit our website.

County Collectors Club

This year’s participating artists will be creating one unique 6- x 6- inch piece of original art and selling it for $75.  County Studio Tour wants to make art affordable for everyone and wants to show that art can be everywhere. Whether this is your first time buying original art or you are a seasoned collector, the tour now has something for everyone. In some instances, a favorite artist might be out of someone’s price range, but now with the County Collectors Club, art is within reach. Some art enthusiasts are out of wall space yet enjoy the thrill of adding new art to their collection. This becomes possible with the County Collectors Club since the pieces are considered small. 

County Collectors Club is not an exclusive club and there are no membership fees or dues. Just come out and enjoy our one weekend of open studios. 

All the pieces are uniform in size and framed with a simple, elegant black frame. To assure quality and uniqueness, all pieces will have a specially-marked certificate printed on the back commemorating this year’s studio tour. County Studio Tour is asking the artist to create only one commemorative piece of art, so plan your day and get out early to ensure you have art on your walls by Monday!

County Collectors Club is made possible by the generous support of local businesses.

Montgomery County Open Studio Tour

Curious to meet Montgomery County artists? June 9th and 10th

Visit our website.

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