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Getty Research Institute and Philadelphia Museum of Art Announce Two-Part Virtual Event

Getty Research Institute and Philadelphia Museum of Art Announce Two-Part Virtual Event Spotlighting the Iconic Arensberg Collection and Legendary Couple Who Created It

LOS ANGELES and PHILADELPHIA— The Getty Research Institute and the Philadelphia Museum of Art are pleased to announce a two-part virtual event exploring the display of one of the most important private collections in the United States of avant-garde and pre-Columbian art.

During the first half of the twentieth century, Louise and Walter Arensberg carved out a unique place in the history of collecting. No one before them had made such audacious connections between modern painting, Renaissance literature, and pre-Columbian sculpture; and few, if any, used collecting more forcefully as a medium for artistic creation and intellectual exploration.

Much has been made of the significance of how the Arensbergs’ collection took shape in their Manhattan apartment following the Armory Show in 1913 and of their influential role as patrons in the New York Dada circle. Until now, less has been understood about how their collection expanded and changed in character after their move to Los Angeles in 1921, particularly after they purchased their Hollywood home and turned it into a house museum and research institute. For the next three decades, prior to the establishment of a public modern art museum in the region, the Arensbergs put the European avant-garde, the English Renaissance, and Mesoamerican civilizations into dialogue in dense and playful displays that shocked and inspired visitors—including some of the period’s leading artists, writers, and curators. In 1950, the couple gifted their collection of avant-garde and Pre-Columbian art to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. When Louise and Walter died in 1953 and 1954, respectively, their rare books, manuscripts and personal papers were gifted to California’s Francis Bacon Library (now housed at the Huntington Library).

In this two-part event, Mark Nelson, William H. Sherman, and Ellen Hoobler, authors of the recently published book Hollywood Arensberg: Avant-Garde Collecting in Midcentury L.A. (Getty Research Institute), discuss and illuminate the Arenbergs’ fascinating collection.

Part I: The Arensbergs’ Hollywood House-Museum: Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 6:00–7:30 p.m. EST. Arcadia Library Lecture.

Matthew Affron, the Philip and Muriel Berman Curator of Modern Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will moderate a lively discussion with the authors as they share how they mined archival materials, including at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, to uncover the unpublished history of the Arensberg collection on the West coast, and ultimately reconstruct how the works of art were displayed in their Hollywood home. Drawing from this new research, the discussion will also examine how this display reflected the collecting tastes and worldview of the Arensbergs.

Please visit Philadelphia Museum of Arts’ site to register in advance for this free online event: https://philamuseum.org/calendar/event/arensbergs-hollywood-house-museum

Part II: The Arensberg’s Collection: Space, Place, Time: Tuesday, March 9, 2021, 3:00–4:30 p.m. PST

In the second of two conversations, Mary Miller, director of the Getty Research Institute, and authors Mark Nelson, William H. Sherman, and Ellen Hoobler will explore how the context of the collection shaped how it was assembled, displayed, and interpreted.

Register in advance for this online event: https://getty.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gTiIjKdlS2qoVPl6jV6cQQ 

About the Participants

MATTHEW AFFRON is the Muriel and Philip Berman Curator of Modern Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

ELLEN HOOBLER is the William B. Ziff, Jr., Associate Curator of Art of the Americas at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore.

MARY MILLER is the director of the Getty Research Institute.

MARK NELSON is an author, design director, and partner at the book design firm McCall Associates in New York.

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN is director of the Warburg Institute in London.

Sponsor

The Arcadia Library Lecture at the Philadelphia Museum of Art is generously supported by the Arcadia Foundation.

About the Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection in Philadelphia

Louise and Walter Arensberg’s extraordinary gift to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1950, together with that of A. E. Gallatin, forms the cornerstone of the institution’s modern art collection. Their path to becoming collectors was set in 1913 after a visit to the legendary Armory Show in New York, where they encountered Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2), a painting they would later acquire. In 1915 they eagerly opened their home to Duchamp, inaugurating a forty-year friendship and collaboration between the artist and the collectors.

During their collecting career, the Arensbergs purchased works by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Salvador Dalí, Marc Chagall, and Vasily Kandinsky, among others, and assembled the largest collection of Constantin Brancusi’s sculpture outside Paris. As their interests extended well beyond Western art, their holdings of pre-Columbian art were displayed alongside contemporary works. The couple amassed the foremost collection of Duchamp’s work in the world, contributing to making the museum in Philadelphia a place of pilgrimage for generations of artists and lovers of the avant-garde.

About the Getty Research Institute

The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of the J. Paul Getty Trust. It serves education in the broadest sense by increasing knowledge and understanding about art and its history through advanced research. The Research Institute provides intellectual leadership through its research, exhibition, and publication programs and provides service to a wide range of scholars worldwide through residencies, fellowships, online resources, and a Research Library. The Research Library—housed in the 201,000-square-foot Research Institute building designed by Richard Meier—is one of the largest art and architecture libraries in the world. The general library collections (secondary sources) include almost 900,000 volumes of books, periodicals, and auction catalogues encompassing the history of Western art and related fields in the humanities. The Research Library’s special collections include rare books, artists’ journals, sketchbooks, architectural drawings and models, photographs, and archival materials.

About the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is Philadelphia’s art museum. A place that welcomes everyone. A world-renowned collection. A landmark building. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Social Media

Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/Tumblr/YouTube: @philamuseum

Press Contacts

Getty Research Institute
Amy Hood, Getty Communications
ahood@getty.edu

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Justin Rubich, Media Relations Coordinator
Justin.rubich@philamuseum.orgpressroom@philamuseum.orgNewsroom

Contact

Norman KeyesDirector of CommunicationsNKeyes@philamuseum.org(215) 684-7862/M: 215-460-9568
Joy DeibertSenior Press OfficerJoy.Deibert@philamuseum.org(215) 684-7864/M: 267-667-2622
Justin RubichMedia Relations CoordinatorJustin.rubich@philamuseum.org(215) 684-7363/M: 321-422-9734
Press Roompressroom@philamuseum.org(215) 684-7860

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Getty Research Institute and Philadelphia Museum of Art Announce Two-Part Virtual Event Spotlighting the Iconic Arensberg Collection and Legendary Couple Who Created It

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Dec 08,2020-Museum Publishes Scholarly Volume of American Furniture featuring Masterpieces from the CollectionMain Building

2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130
215-763-8100Hours

  • Sunday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
  • Monday, Closed
  • Tuesday, Closed
  • Wednesday, noon–7:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
  • Friday, noon–7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Thank you to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the content of this post.

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Adapting

Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change
A solo exhibition of new work by sculptor Jedediah Morfit

Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change
Jedediah Morfit, Gills: Grow A Pair, 2019, Mixed media, 8.5 x 9 x 33”


Paradigm Gallery + Studio is pleased to present Adapting to Change,
a solo exhibition of new sculptural works by Jedediah Morfit, opening* May 29, 2020 and remaining on view through June 27, 2020. Known for using traditional techniques to create contemporary interpretations of historical forms, Morfit explored new digital fabrication processes specifically for this exhibition. The resulting busts are raw and vibrant, but still preserves Morfit’s signature precision.

Morfit’s artistic practice subverts traditional figurative sculpture and mirrors his own lived, contemporary experience. By combining old-world techniques with modern material, his past works created a juxtaposition between old and new, sculpture and sculptor. That tension is still at the heart of Morfit’s practice, but it has evolved to reflect new artistic technologies. In Adapting to Change, the muted busts Morfit is known for have gone through a total contemporary, bordering on futuristic, transformation. Digitally crafted, embedded with mixed media, dosed in color, manipulated, these works are a major departure for the artist. Unlike his last exhibition at Paradigm in 2017, the pieces in Adapting to Change are not about a modeler’s sensibility, but rather focuses on the intricacies of process, color and material.

Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change
Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change, Paradigm Gallery +Studio


While Morfit’s new process uses digital tools, there is still evidence of the artist’s touch. The final pieces, while incredibly detailed, do not look manufactured or automated in any way. While many of the pieces in the exhibition started with existing 3D scans of Greek and Italian busts, they were realized through a combination of 3D fabrication tools and traditional modeling and casting techniques. Many of the pieces are embedded with found objects, like plastic beads and cake doilies, which act as a part of the piece’s DNA; exploited for their texture and bright colors. Morfit takes the intact busts, cuts them up and puts them (almost) back together again. The ensuing works are presented slightly off kilter, hanging upside down or teetering off an edge.

The works in Adapting to Change are intended to look and feel disjointed. Countless hours were spent composing the busts, only to be deconstructed, modified, rebuilt, and reimagined. The shifting process mimics Morfit’s own sense of having lost and scrambling to keep his balance, as the ground shifts beneath his feet.


*Due to COVID-19, “Adapting to Change” will be on view at https://www.paradigmarts.org/ until further notice. During the exhibition, Paradigm hopes to be able to allow a limited number of viewing appointments, but this is dependent on the current policies of the CDC, WHO and the Governor and Mayor’s offices. Paradigm Gallery’s number one priority is the safety and wellness of their visitors. For live updates on the exhibition and appointments, please visit the Paradigm website and socials. For any questions on Paradigm’s current policies, please email info@paradigm-gallery.com.

About Jedediah Morfit
Jedediah Morfit received his MFA in sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2005, where he was awarded the Sylvia Leslie Herman Young Scholarship and the Award Of Excellence. He was a Fellow at the Center For Emerging Visual Artists from 2007-2009, and received a New Jersey Council On the Arts Fellowship for sculpture in 2009. He received the Louise Kahn Award for Sculpture from the Woodmere Art Museum in 2006, and was awarded the Dexter Jones Award for Bas Relief from the National Sculpture Society in 2011 and 2012. In

2013, he was commissioned to create a series of new work for Artlantic:Wonder, which was named one of the 50 best public art projects in the Public Art Network’s Year in Review. His work has been shown in numerous group and solo exhibitions, and featured in The New York Times, Sculpture Review, Artnews and American Craft Magazine, as well as on NJTV’s State Of the Arts. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and three (count ‘em, three) children.

Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change
Jedediah Morfit: Adapting to Change, Paradigm Gallery + Studio


About Paradigm Gallery
Paradigm Gallery + Studio® exhibits contemporary artwork from around the world with a focus on Philadelphia-based artists. Established February 2010, the gallery began as a project between co-founders and curators, Jason Chen and Sara McCorriston, as a space in which to create artwork, to exhibit the work of their peers, and to invite the members of the community to create and collect in a welcoming gallery setting. Now open 10 years, the gallery still aims to welcome all collectors, from first time to lifelong, and continues to support accessible work that welcomes a wide audience.


Location:
746 S 4th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

Thank you to Madison Fishman for the content of this post.

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Bit

Alaska Reimagined, Erica Harney, A Bit of the Arts

Dear Friends, Neighbors and Art Lovers, If you’re staying local for the holiday weekend, I’d like to invite you to

A BIT OF THE ARTS: HOLIDAY ART SALE

Friday, November 29th from 4:00 – 8:00, Saturday, November 30th from 10:00 – 4:00.
*Free Admission*

Galaxy,Erica Harney

 
Live Music* Food* Pottery* Jewelry* Photography* Paper Arts* Fibers* Painting* Printmaking and More! Twentieth Century Club.

Twentieth Century Club 84 South Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, PA 19050. In the heart of beautiful, historic Lansdowne, the Twentieth Century Club awaits you and your guests in a gracious, one hundred year old, arts and crafts style building.

Please note – Lansdowne is in Upper Darby/West Philly. NOT Lansdale, which is in Montgomery County. Easy mistake to make! I will be there with my watercolors and other small, framed pieces! For more information visit the event page.

Leaf,Erica Harney

Can’t make it in real life? Check out my Etsy Shop! Free shipping and gift-wrapping within the continental US :)Hope to see you there. Either way, have a lovely holiday!

Leaf 86,Erica Harney

Thank you to Erica Harney for the content of this post.

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Wall

Nicki Hitz Edson, Medusa Mask, 1975. Crocheted wool. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear

November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features 115 works by 62 artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it also includes works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition introduces to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Schafler Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.” 

Sharron Hedges, Midnight Sky (Julie’s Coat), 1977. Wool, crocheted. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013. 

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving. In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. Included in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel. 

Janet Lipkin, African Mask, 1970. Wool, leather, wood. Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Muriel Kallis Newman, 2003. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design.  Marika Contompasis’s machine-knitted kimono made of rectangular sections, Trout-Magnolia Kimono, 1977, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. The section also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974,inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section. 

Oh, Mother Earth (Neil Young, 1990) is a nod to the publications The Whole Earth Catalog (1968) and Mother Earth News (1970) and looks to nature and environmental concerns while another section, This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1944) explores iconic American imagery from the Brooklyn Bridge to the American West. Examples in those two sections include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature. 

Joan Steiner, Manhattan Collar, 1979. Silk, wool, cotton, lace, and buckram
Collection of Joanna S. Rose. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale

In A Land Called Fantasy (Earth, Wind & Fire, 1977) explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with itsflowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. Red Ray, from the series, Seven Rays, by Kaisik Wong, is included as an example of a work that was commissioned by his close friend Salvador Dalí in 1974 for the grand opening of the Dalí Theatre Museum in Figueres, Spain. Nearby is Mario Rivoli’s Overdone Jacket, 1973, made of found objects such as pins, metal bottle caps, beads, and other items. 

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Linda J. Mendelson, In Kyo-Kawara, 2015, Wool machine knitted, plastic buttons. Promised gift of The Julie Schaffler Dale Collection.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991. 

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1968) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. Jo-Ellen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Sheila Perez Ghidini, Combat Vest, circa 1985.Molded plastic figures on quilted plain weave supplemental warp and weft patterning. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.” 

Publication
Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators

Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

Support

This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, Catherine and Laurence Altman, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors.

Social Media

Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/Tumblr/YouTube: @philamuseum

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is Philadelphia’s art museum. We are a world-renowned collection. A landmark building. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Thank you to the Philadelphia Museum of Art press room for the content of this post.

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Garden

Amie Potsic, Girl in the Garden: Paradise #1, Archival pigment print, 22” x 29”, 2019, ©Amie Potsic 2019

California wildfires and female empowerment fuel immersive exhibition on climate change and gender equality.

Exhibition extended to host

Climate Reality presentation and panel discussion on November 20th 

followed by One Tree Planted planting a tree for every person who attends.

Girl in the Garden: Danger in Paradise

A solo exhibition by Amie Potsic

Presented by: HOT•BED | James Oliver Gallery & Amie Potsic Art Advisory, LLC

Through November 20, 2019

– EVENTS –

CLOSING RECEPTION:
Saturday, November 16, 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

TO RSVP:  https://www.amiepotsicartadvisory.com/events/2019/11/16/girl-in-the-garden-closing-reception

Amie Potsic, Girl in the Garden: Paradise #3, Archival pigment print, 22” x 33”, 2019, ©Amie Potsic 2019

CLIMATE REALITY PRESENTATION AND PANEL: Wednesday, November 20, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

“The Story of Art and Climate: Creating Change Through Art & Action”

Artist Panel Discussion featuring: Amie Potsic, Ana Vizcarra Rankin, Marguerita Hagan & Deirdre Murphy

24 Hours of Reality Presentations by: Al Morales and Alana Morales

Scientific Presentation by:Dr. Erik Cordes, Professor & Vice Chair, Ecology and Integrative Biology, Temple University and Alexis Weinnig, Graduate Student, Department of Biology, Temple University

To RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-story-of-art-and-climate-creating-change-through-art-and-action-tickets-79199348383

Vision (Detail 1)” Mixed Media on Panel, 36” x 72” Ó Amie Potsic 2019

 

Location:HOT•BED, 723 Chestnut St, 2nd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19106, 267-918-7432

https://www.hotbedphilly.com/current

Gallery Hours:

Wednesday – Friday 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Saturdays 1:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Other times by appointment

Admission is free

Inquiries and information:

Amie Potsic, Artist

amie@amiepotsicartadvisory.com  |  www.amiepotsic.com  |  610-731-6312

Chelsea Markowitz, PR

chelsea@projectcmc.com | 856-404-4677

Anais Cooper-Hackman, Gallery

anais@hotbedphilly.com | jamesolivergallery@gmail.com | 267-918-7432

Presented in partnership with:

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Philadelphia, PA – Hot Bed and James Oliver Gallery, located at 723 Chestnut St, Second Floor, Philadelphia, PA presents Girl in the Garden: Danger in Paradise, a solo exhibition featuring renowned photographer and installation artist Amie Potsic.  With a focus on climate change, California wildfires, and gender equality, the exhibition includes a new large-scale silk installation, photographic prints, and mixed media works.  In addition to the exhibition, HOT•BED will host a Climate Reality Presentation and Artist Panel Discussion, after which One Tree Planted will plant a tree for every person that attends.  The exhibition is on view from September 14 through November 20.  There will be a Closing Reception with the artist on Saturday, November 16 from 2:00 – 5:00pm.  The Climate Reality Event will be on Wednesday, November 20 from 6:00 – 7:30 PM.  Both events are free and open to the public and rsvp is encouraged.  Gallery hours are Wednesday through Friday from 5:00 – 8:00 PM and Saturday from 1:00 – 8:00 PM or by appointment.

Amie Potsic, Paradise (installation detail), Archival pigment print on over 250 feet of silk, Dimensions variable, 2019, ©Amie Potsic 2019

Girl in the Garden: Danger in Paradise is a solo exhibition of new work by Amie Potsic addressing climate change through the complex viewpoints of girlhood, deforestation, and Magical Realism.  With site-specific installations, photographs, and mixed media works, Potsic collaborates with HOT•BED, a unique fine art and horticulture gallery, to produce an incarnate exploration of female identity, the forested lifeblood of our planet, and the fate of humankind. 

“In tandem with the incredible upsurge in Climate Change activism and brave examples set by youth leading the charge, this exhibition delves into the complexity and opportunities involved in the issues and provides paths for action,” says Amie Potsic.

After photographing her daughter in the lush forests of the northeastern United States, the artist traveled to Paradise, California and surrounding forests (located upwind from her extended family’s home) to photograph the complete devastation caused by the deadliest wildfire in the state’s history.  Personal experience underscoring the urgency of climate change, Potsic intertwines visions of girlhood in a magical environment with nature’s unprecedented destruction caused by wildfires. 

Unfortunately, the number and severity of wildfires in California continues to grow with recent fires burning out of control as recently as one week ago.  Harnessing the power of imagination and urgency, Potsic’s work is a call to action.  Visitors will find shared resources for taking environmental action in their own lives. 

The exhibition has been extended to host a discussion and presentation on the positive impact of the arts on the Climate Change movement and how creativity and storytelling can create change: “The Story of Art and Climate: Creating Change Through Art & Action.”As part of the 24 Hours of Reality, an international day of Climate presentations offered by Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project, HOT•BED will host an artist panel discussion and climate presentations with scientific experts.  One Tree Planted has committed to planting one tree for every attendee at this presentation.

The artist panel will include Amie Potsic, Ana Vizcarra Rankin, Marguerita Hagan, and Deirdre Murphy.  Each artist’s work looks at climate change from a unique perspective:  Potsic deals with deforestation and wildfires, Rankin addresses human migration and humanity’s impact on the planet, Hagan explores ocean life and interrelated ecosystems, while Murphy integrates scientific experimentation and bird migration

Climate Reality Presenters, Al Morales and his 17-year-old daughter Alana Morales, are presenters trained by Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project.  They will provide facts and opportunities highlighting the impact of climate change on the planet and humanity.

Dr. Erik Cordes, Professor & Vice Chair of Ecology and Integrative Biology at Temple University and Alexis Weinnig, a graduate student in the Department of Biology at Temple University will share information on their research, which focuses on understanding the areas of the deep sea that support the highest biomass communities: deep-water coral reefs, natural hydrocarbon seeps, and hydrothermal vents. 

On November 20–21, the world is coming together to talk about the climate crisis with:

24 Hours of Reality: Truth in Action: https://www.24hoursofreality.org/

One Tree Planted has committed to planting one tree for everyone that attends one of the international presentations:  https://onetreeplanted.org/

Amie Potsic, MFA is an accomplished photographer and installation artist living in the Philadelphia area whose work addresses cultural, personal, and natural phenomena through the lens of climate change and social responsibility.  Potsic has exhibited her work internationally at the Art Park in Rhodes, Greece; Museo de Arte Moderno de Bogotá, Colombia; Medfoundart di Cagliari, Italy; the Royal College of London; the Museum of New Art in Detroit; The Woodmere Art Museum, The National Constitution Center Museum, The Painted Bride and James Oliver Gallery in Philadelphia; Mission 17 in San Francisco; and 626 Gallery in Los Angeles.  Her work has been published in The San Francisco ChronicleArt MattersThe Photo Review, and The Philadelphia Inquirer.  Potsic received her MFA in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute and BA’s in Photojournalism and English Literature from Indiana University.  She has held faculty appointments at the University of California at BerkeleyOhlone College, and the San Francisco Art Institute and has been a guest lecturer at The University of the Arts, Ursinus College, and The International Center of Photography. 

Potsic is currently the CEO and Principal of Amie Potsic Art Advisory, LLC providing visionary and advisory support to artists, collectors, businesses, and institutions with expertise in Legacy Planning and Fine Art Appraisals.  She is also Chair of the Art in City Hall Artistic Advisory Board to the Office of Arts and Culture of the City of Philadelphia.

Bridging James Oliver’s (James Oliver Gallery) eye for contemporary art and Bryan Hoffman’s (Hoffman Design Group) passion for horticulture design, HOT•BED is an ultra-collaborative gallery and event space that explores the relationship between our intrinsic connection to nature (biophilia) and art in new and exciting ways. 

HOT•BED andJames Oliver Gallery, located at 723 Chestnut St, Second Floor, Philadelphia, PA present Girl in the Garden:  Danger in Paradise, a solo exhibition featuring renowned photographer and installation artist Amie Potsic with a focus on climate change and gender identity.  The exhibition runs from September 14 through November 20.  The exhibition will host a Closing Reception on Saturday, November 16 from 2:00 – 5:00 PM and a Climate Reality Event on Wednesday, November 20 from 6:00 – 7:30 PM.

For more information, please contact Amie Potsic at amie@amiepotsicartadvisory.com or 610-731-6312 or Chelsea Markowitz at chelsea@projectcmc.com or 856-404-4677.

Thank you to Amie Potsic for the content of this post.

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