Category Archives: Photography Philadelphia

Philadelphia photographers and photographs.

Digging

As By Digging

As By Digging, Jaime Alvarez, Olivia Jia, Michelle Marcuse

InLiquid @ The Painted Bride

As By Digging features three artists—Jaime Alvarez, Olivia Jia, Michelle Marcuse—working in distinct media, whose works suggest an archaeological position to their subjects. Materials are used to draw out contradictions in our relationships to things and spaces with unclear origins: Photographs pronounce their subject with a different accent; paintings reflect on tangible objects without pointing us in the direction of where exactly we are; cardboard is put together to seem like lumbering parts reclaimed from a shipwreck. Split personalities can be sensed in the work, and each of the artists use their medium to collapse the distance between what we expect something to be and our fantasies of how it actually performs. The Indiana Jones franchise is a useful comparison in popular culture, in which the medium of film is a bridge between an intellectual’s quiet scholarly pursuit and their alter ego’s perilous adventure.

In contrast to an action movie, the excavations here unfold more quietly and without black and white good and bad guys. Jaime Alvarez’s photographs of small, synthetic figurines appear giant and alive; Michelle Marcuse’s bits of cardboard and glue take on machinic obscurity; Olivia Jia manipulates paint illusionistically in an idiosyncratic approach to cataloging personal documents and art history fragments. Amidst these approaches, we become conscious of our connection to a vast lineage of human remains, and the strange moment when our distance to these emergent totems is both closed and accentuated.

Jaime Alvarez’s work introduces us to some of the fundamental poles of the photographic medium. His large prints of uniformly painted figurines, trinkets, and other left-behinds, in either jet black or white, offer a sumptuous version of familiar things while they remain at the distance imposed by their singularity and iconized stature. Amidst these delectable yet cold memento mori, there appear straightly documented rooms of an empty, crumbling home. In their quiet, irreversible decay, we find we can pay attention.

Olivia Jia calls on the sleight of hand in painting to place us into an object’s space. Curious specificity meets ambivalent setting. Busts of classical, familiar statues are captured in a moment of focus, and provide little context for their inner fracturing. Fragments of personal ephemera, art historical reproductions, and more abstracted yet referential piles of historic matter are similarly reverent yet concise in what they appear to describe.

In the cardboard and glue sculptures of Michelle Marcuse, we encounter flexible understandings of reverence and delicateness. That which is flimsy is not necessarily weak; lightness in weight is not bound to a lightness in being. Her objects, while small in stature, imply something grand, aged and important, and indeed heavy. Each one is a space that is found out, by a process of physical conflicts and resolutions with the material. We come to detect them, not by a definitive allegation from their author about their personalities, but by the clear relationship between the object and the hands constructing it.

The Painted Bride Cafe Gallery, 230 Vine Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, noon – 6:00pm

As By Digging: November 1, 2017 – December 16, 2017

Reception Dates: Friday, December 1, 2017 · 5:00 pm–7:00 pm

Thank you to Michelle Marcuse for the content of this post.

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FUTUREPROOF

Futureproof, HAVERFORD'S CANTOR FITZGERALD GALLERY

FUTUREPROOF at Haverford’s Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery Explores Our Present by Interrogating How We Imagine THE FUTURE

Artists, writers, inventors, moviemakers, militaries, and think tanks have long tried to predict coming technologies or foresee catastrophic events — not merely for entertainment’s sake, but to prepare for possible outcomes, quell anxieties, or gird against tragedy. Shell Oil even has a “Scenarios” team, founded in 1965 and still working today, whose job is to explore “possible versions of the future by identifying drivers, uncertainties, enablers and constraints, and unearthing potential issues and their implications.” A new exhibit at Haverford College‘s Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, Futureproof, gathers work from contemporary artists on this theme with real-world images and archives from governmental and corporate scenario planners to explore how we have imagined and continue to imagine different futures.

In engineering, industrial design, and architecture, “futureproofing” typically refers to creating something in a way that minimizes or slows down technological obsolescence. Futureproofing methods are often reflective of people’s anxieties, aspirations, and assumptions about the present, sometimes acting as self-fulfilling prophecies. In this sense, they recall another form of proof—proof as mathematical argument, defined by a series of accepted axioms and truths. The artists in Futureproof engage with the many malleable interpretations of futureproofing, drawing from both the legacy of military and corporate scenario planning and the use of semi-fictionalized artifacts or archives as “proof,” or evidence, of alternate timelines or futures yet to come.

So, a 1991 in-house film on climate change produced by the Shell Corporation will be shown alongside a multi-faceted installation by Ilona Gaynor (“Everything Ends in Chaos”), featuring 2D and 3D objects with video in a piece that deconstructs corporate risk assessment. The Guantanamo Bay Museum of Art and History, which foresees that the detention facilities in Cuba have been closed and replaced with a museum that reflects on Guantanamo Bay’s social and political significance, will be represented, as will images and archival documents from Cybersyn Project, the real-life cybernetics economy-management operation of Salvador Allende’s Chilean government.

In a time when each day seems to bring a new cascade of political uncertainties, when every “now” is assumed to be “more than ever” and every crisis feels more unmanageable than the last, Futureproof encourages viewers to interrogate the fraught systems of the present moment and imagine how they might be otherwise.

Futureproof is curated by Ingrid Burrington and features the work of Morehshin AllahyariSalome Asega, Gui Bonsiepe and the Cybersyn Project, the United States Department of Energy, Ilona GaynorAyodamola Tanimowo Okunseinde, Shell Corporation, and The Guantánamo Bay Museum of Art and HistoryFutureproof is supported by the John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Futureproof will be on view Oct. 27 through Dec. 17, at Haverford College’s Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery. On Friday, Oct. 27, to celebrate the show’s opening, there will be a talk by curator Ingrid Burrington at 4:30 p.m. followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m. An associated screening of Peter Galison and Robb Moss’s film Containment will take place Nov. 29, at 7 p.m., in the Visual Culture, Arts, and Media building’s screening room. For details and additional related events: exhibits.haverford.edu/futureproof.

Overseen by the John B. Hurford ’60 Center for the Arts and Humanities and located in Whitehead Campus Center, the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery is open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesdays until 8 p.m. For more information, contact Matthew Seamus Callinan, associate director of the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery and campus exhibitions, at (610) 896-1287 or mcallina@haverford.edu, or visit the exhibitions program website: www.haverford.edu/exhibits.

Haverford College is located at 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, Pa., 19041

Thank you to Rebecca Raber for the content of this post.

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Photographic

PSoP Salon

Photography by Members, 2017 Photographic Salon

The Photographic Society of Philadelphia is holding it’s annual salon at The Plastic Club, 247 South Camac Street, The Avenue of the Artists, Philadelphia, PA, 19107 through October 26th, 2017. The galleries of the historic artist club are filled with the work of 33 Philadelphia photographers. Tuesday evening, October 17th, is the monthly members meeting which features lectures and presentations by visiting photographers and members work. The Plastic Club has a cool AV system which allows us to really enjoy our fellow photographers presentations.

Sunday October 22 is a final artist reception from 2:00 – 4:00pm.

PSoP Salonlight being (Bowie), digital photograph, DoN Brewer

Three of my photographs are on display, I created a new piece for this show that is special to me. Returning to a theme I explored over ten years ago, I printed a shot from 2006, titled light being (Bowie). The abstract landscape photograph is 30″ x 20″, printed by Photo Lounge on lustre photo paper, is a continuation of my search for ethereal light effects in the urban environment. Incorporating photography into my art life is important to me because of the plastic nature of the practice; line, shape, color are the illustrative elements of developing a good picture.

Please visit The Photographic Society of Philadelphia salon at The Plastic Club, the collection of work is unique, directional, provocative and inspiring.

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Analog

The Halide Project, Gravy StudioIryna Glik, Untitled, cyanotype on watercolor paper

Exhibition of Contemporary Analog Photography Features Artists

Selected from an International Open Call

PHILADELPHIA, PA — The Halide Project is pleased to announce its second annual juried exhibition of traditional and alternative process photography entitled Living Image, which will be on display at Gravy Studio & Gallery in Northern Liberties from October 6-29, 2017.

Selected from an international call for entry by juror John Caperton, the works on view in Living Image demonstrate the breadth, depth, and delight of contemporary analog photography. Showcasing an array of traditional and alternative photographic methods, Living Image serves to reconnect viewers with the handmade aspects of photography that have largely been disassociated from the medium in the digital age.

The Halide Project, Gravy StudioTodd Birdsong, Abandonment Issues, Goodman 428 #1, Gelatin Silver Print, Heat Exposure, Chemical Contamination

This year’s Living Image features the work of 23 artists from the Philadelphia region, across the U.S., and beyond including Michael Ast, Todd Birdsong, Mike Browna, Bob Carnie, Devon John Chebra, Cora Cluett, Anne Eder, Iryna Glik, Susan M. Gordon, Haley Hasen, Mike Hoover, Lucang Huang, John Jackson, Roger Matsumoto, Kathleen Nademus, Shaina Nyman, Denise Ross, Patricia Scialo, Craig Scheihing, Andrew Tershakovec, Amanda Tinker, Angela Franks Wells, and Rick Wright.

The work will be on view Thursdays through Sundays from Noon to 6:00pm, or by appointment, throughout the duration of the show.

Opening weekend events include a public preview on First Friday, October 6th, 5–9PM, an Artists Reception on Saturday, October 7th, 5:00 – 9:00pm with Juror’s Talk by John Caperton, and Philadelphia Open Studio Tour hours on Sunday, October 8th, 12:00 – 6:00pm.

The Halide Project, Gravy StudioCraig Scheihing, Marisol, C-print

Interactive and educational programming presented in conjunction with the exhibition includes an Informal Group Critique on Thursday, October 19th, 6-9PM at Gravy Studio & Gallery where visitors can present and discuss their own work; a Polaroid Transfer Workshop with Matt Ashby on Sunday, October 22nd, 1-4PM, at Gravy Studio & Gallery, with a $10 materials fee; and a Wet Collodion Tintype Demo with CJ Harker on Sunday, October 29th, 1-4PM, at 1627 N. 2nd Street, with a $10 materials fee.

A full calendar of Living Image events detailing event and registration information can be found on The Halide Project’s website: www.thehalideproject.org.

The Halide Project, Gravy StudioAmanda Tinker, Untitled, from series Small Animal, Platinum/Palladium Print

Living Image Supporters and Sponsors

Living Image has been generously supported by a grant from the Penn Treaty Special Services District. Opening Reception refreshments are provided by Russet. Exhibition Prizes are sponsored by Indie Photo Lab, The Photo Review, and Velvet Glove.

About The Halide Project

The Halide Project was founded in Philadelphia in 2015 to foster the traditional photographic arts. Its mission is to be a local and global resource for artists working in film and alternative processes, as well as to (re)introduce the public to the beauty and magic of pre digital photographic techniques. Current and prospective programming includes photography exhibitions, workshops, a community darkroom workspace, mobile darkroom outreach, and an artist residency focusing on film and alternative process photography.

About The Juror

John Caperton currently serves as the Jensen Bryan Curator at The Print Center in Philadelphia, a nonprofit gallery that has been serving the printmaking and photography community for over 100 years. He has curated more than forty exhibitions for The Print Center since 2007 and was on the curatorial team and in the publication of Philagrafika 2010: The Graphic Unconscious, a citywide contemporary art festival. Caperton oversees a number of The Print Center’s public programs, including its Artists-in-Schools Program, which places teaching artists in classrooms in Philadelphia public high schools. He moderated the keynote panel for the 2010 Southern Graphics Conference and participated in the Curatorial Intensive program of Independent Curators International. Caperton received his BA in Art History at the University of Chicago. He was the Exhibitions Coordinator at Locks Gallery in Philadelphia and has also held positions at the Association for Public Art and the Anderson Gallery at Virginia Commonwealth University.

The Halide Project, Gravy StudioAngela Franks Wells,Wispy, Chromoskedasic Sabattier Print

Details

What: Living Image, a juried art exhibition featuring traditional and alternative process photography by 23 artists selected by juror John Caperton

WhereGravy Studio & Gallery, 910 N. 2nd St. Philadelphia, PA 19123

When: On view October 6th – October 29th, 2017

Reception and Juror’s Talk: Saturday, October 7th, 5-9PM

Regular viewing hours: Thursdays – Sundays, 12:00 – 6:00pm or by appointment

Contact: Dale Rio

Email: info@thehalideproject.org Tel: (919) 599-2899

www.thehalideproject.org

Thank you to The Halide Project Team for the content of this post.

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Asynchronist

Asynchronist, Alex Eckman-Lawn and Jason ChenHollow, Jason Chen and Alex Eckman-Lawn, 2017. Layered cut paper/collage/woven photo. 16.75 x 12.75 inches. Courtesy Paradigm Gallery + Studio.

Paradigm Gallery + Studio is pleased to announce Asynchronist, an exhibition of new works by Alex Eckman-Lawn and Jason Chen.

The presentation explores the aesthetic and conceptual connections between the artists’ practices, with a particular focus on the use of paper cut mediums to investigate the notion of separation. Several works on view were made collaboratively, a first for both artists. The exhibition is on view through October 21, 2017.

Calling to mind the work of Max Ernst and Joseph Cornell, this exhibition presents Eckman-
Lawn’s cut paper and collage pieces that explore the artist’s fear of the body, particularly how Hollow, Jason Chen and Alex Eckman-Lawn, 2017. Layered cut paper/collage/woven photo. 16.75 x 12.75 inches.

Asynchronist, Alex Eckman-Lawn and Jason ChenCaptive Witness, Alex Eckman Lawn, 2017

The body physically entraps and cages the human subject. Drawing from his experience as an
illustrator, he creates a visual narrative using his own distinct vocabulary of symbols and
images, combining seemingly disparate images and sources. Jason Chen will present a new series of handwoven photographs that investigates the notion of duality, interrogating the liminal space between aesthetic perspectives. Rather than a concern with patterning that typifies much of woven artwork, Chen utilizes the process of weaving to deconstruct and reconstruct the photographic image.

About Alex Eckman-Lawn

Alex Eckman-Lawn creates multi-layered, hand-cut, paper collages using everything from his
original digital paintings to imagery from old medical texts. Each layer is spaced, creating a
depth that draws you into the works. His work has appeared in comic books, on album covers,
book covers, T-shirts, music videos, and posters. His cut paper works have most recently been
on display at SCOPE Miami Beach, Art on Paper NY, Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Arch Enemy
Arts, Art Dept., Gallery 1988, Crane Arts Ice Box, Bottleneck Gallery, and more. Eckman-Lawn
received his BFA in Illustration from the University of the Arts in 2007, and is a Philadelphia
native.

About Jason Chen

Jason Chen is originally from Guangzhou, China. He received his BFA in Animation from the
University of Arts in 2008. Jason is a Philadelphia based Photographer specializing in Fashion,
Editorial, and Alternative Process Photography. He is the Co-Founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio and Juggling Wolf (a film and animation production studio). Jason’s work has been
displayed in galleries and venues including: Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Crane Arts, The Light
Room Gallery, Trust Gallery, Kimmel Center, and Commerce Square.

Asynchronist, Alex Eckman-Lawn and Jason ChenWhat If, Jason Chen, 2017

About Paradigm Gallery + Studio

Established February 2010, Paradigm Gallery + Studio® started as a project between co-
founders and curators, Jason Chen and Sara McCorriston, to create a space in which to make artwork, to exhibit the work of their peers, and to invite the members of the local community make their own artwork in a welcoming gallery setting. Over the years, Paradigm Gallery + Studio has become a gallery of diverse contemporary artwork from around the world, but still with a focus on Philadelphia artists.

Paradigm Gallery + Studio provides an artistic space for both the visual and performing arts,
with a focus on dedicated, emerging to established Philadelphia-based visual artists. We
provide artists with individualized attention, strong promotional support and a transformable
gallery space to make their own. We strive to make art accessible to the whole community
through free bi-weekly events and support work that welcomes a wide audience.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Instagram: @ParadigmGS
Twitter: @ParadigmGS
Tumblr: paradigm-gallery.tumblr.com
Facebook: facebook.com/paradigmgallery

Thank you to Thomas Brown, Account Manager, for the content of this post. www.aopublic.com  Art + Culture Public Relations (e) thomas@aopublic.com

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