Tag Archives: paintings

Modern Times

Modern Times - Thomas Hart Benton - BurlesqueBurlesque, c. 1922, by Thomas Hart Benton, American, 1889 – 1975. Tempera on panel, 9 1/2x 12 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Edward Suckle, M.D., 2002-91-1. © T. H. Benton and R. P. Benton Testamentary Trusts / UMB Bank Trustee / Licensed by VAGA, New York.

Modern Times: American Art 1910-1950, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Exhibition dates: April 18—September 3, 2018

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is presenting an exhibition exploring the creative responses of American artists to the rapid pace of change that occurred in this country during the early decades of the twentieth century. Modern Times: American Art 1910–1950 examines the new and dynamic visual language that emerged during this period and had a dramatic impact on painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, architecture, and the decorative arts. These developments were shaped by the dizzying transformations then occurring in every aspect of life, from the advent of the automobile and moving pictures to the rapid growth of American cities and the wrenching economic change brought on by the advent of the Great Depression after a decade of unprecedented prosperity. The exhibition features important works by those artists—Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, and John Marin, among them—championed by the great photographer and gallerist Alfred Stieglitz, as well as many other notable figures of this period. Modern Times is drawn almost entirely from the Museum’s renowned collection, especially the gift from the Stieglitz Collection that it received in the late 1940s, and contains 156 works, several of which will be on view for the first time.

Modern Times, Alexander Calder, Portrait of Carl ZigrosserPortrait of Carl Zigrosser (1891 – 1975), c. 1928, by Alexander Calder, American, 1898 – 1976. wire, 14 x 10 1/2 x 10 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund from the Carl and Laura Zigrosser Collection, 1980-3-141. © Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Timothy Rub, the Museum’s George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer, stated: “America’s embrace of modern life—its perils as well as its promise—in the early twentieth century was expressed most clearly in the arts. The work of this period still feels fresh and of the moment. This exhibition provides us with a welcome opportunity to reassess the Museum’s exceptionally rich holdings of modern American art and how we may display them to full advantage in the future when the Museum completes its expansion under its Master Plan. It also holds the promise of many surprises and discoveries for our visitors.”

Modern Times, Stuart Davis, Something on the Eight BallSomething on the Eight Ball, 1953-1954, by Stuart Davis, American, 1892 – 1964. Oil on canvas, 56 × 45 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Adele Haas Turner and Beatrice Pastorius Turner Memorial Fund, 1954-30-1. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York.

While the Museum has presented a number of exhibitions devoted to this subject over the years, Modern Times is the largest and most comprehensive since it presented the collection of Alfred Stieglitz in 1944. The exhibition opens with the achievements of some of the leading figures of “The Eight,” including John Sloan and George Bellows, who recorded the changing urban scene with a gritty realism as horse carts gave way to motor vehicles on city streets.

Modern Times, Beauford Delaney, Portrait of James BaldwinPortrait of James Baldwin, 1945, by Beauford Delaney, American (active Paris), 1901 – 1979. Oil on canvas, 22 x 18 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: 125th Anniversary Acquisition. Purchased with funds contributed by The Daniel W. Dietrich Foundation in memory of Joseph C. Bailey and with a grant from The Judith Rothschild Foundation, 1998-3-1

The exhibition emphasizes those artists—among them Charles Demuth, Morton Schamberg, Charles Sheeler, Benton Spruance, and Paul Strand—who responded to the Armory Show of 1913 and the influence of the European avant garde by seeking to give modernism an authentic American voice. Offering a broader perspective on American art of this period, the exhibition explores the achievements of important African American figures, such as Aaron Douglas, William Edmondson, Horace Pippin and Dox Thrash. It also looks at cross-currents within the arts, including contemporary fashion and design, and work by female artists such as O’Keeffe, Florine Stettheimer, Frances Simpson Stevens, Kay Sage, and Dorothea Tanning.

Modern Times, Charles Demuth, Lancaster (In the Province No. 2)Lancaster (In the Province No. 2), 1920, by Charles Demuth, American, 1883 – 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 x 16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950-5-1.

One section of the exhibition takes a close look at the many artists who explored in their work the abstract qualities of rhythm, light, and sound. Some of their aesthetic strategies were employed to create dynamic still lifes, enlivening what was commonly considered a static genre. Another section explores the expressive use of color, focusing on Arthur Beecher Carles, Henry Breckenridge, and Henry McCarter who stretched the boundaries of artistic tradition by relieving color of its purely descriptive function. These three artists, each of whom lived and worked in Philadelphia, reflected this city’s active engagement with progressive trends in American art. In fact, the significant role that Philadelphia played in the history of American modernism is echoed throughout the exhibition. It includes works by Philadelphia-born artists such as Man Ray and Alexander Calder who became prominent abroad, where they were closely aligned with modern movements in Europe, and others who remained in the city in which the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts provided a center of energy and a place to teach.

Modern Times, Aaron Doulgas, Birds in FlightBirds in Flight, c. 1927-1929, by Aaron Douglas, American, 1899 – 1979. Oil on canvas, 16 1/4 x 14 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest in honor of Anne d’Harnoncourt, 2015-7-1. © Heirs of Aaron Douglas / Licensed by VAGA, New York

Modern Times, Arthur Dove, Chinese MusicChinese Music, 1923, by Arthur Dove, American, 1880 -1946. Oil and metallic paint on panel, 21 11/16 x 18 1/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-2.

Landscape painting was, likewise, revolutionized by the artists of this generation, who found in this traditional genre a sustained source of inspiration. The adaptation of the modernist vision to one of the most enduring themes in American art can be seen most dramatically in works by O’Keeffe, Hartley, and Arthur Dove. Others, such as Sheeler, took the stark, yet impressive geometry of the new industrial landscape as a point of departureThe exhibition also examines another familiar subject, the human figure, which proved to be of abiding interest to the artists of this generation. Included in this rich and fascinating section is a group of portraits by artists such as Milton Avery, Beauford Delaney, and John Graham.

Modern Times, Wharton Esherick, Of a Great CityOf a Great City, 1923, by Wharton H. Esherick, American, 1887 – 1970. Wood engraving, image: 9 15/16 x 6 5/16 inches, sheet: 11 7/16 x 7 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund from the Carl and Laura Zigrosser Collection, 1979-12-11.

Modern Times, Marsden Hartley, Painting No 4 (Black Horse)Painting No. 4 (A Black Horse), 1915, by Marsden Hartley, American, 1877 -1943. Oil on canvas, 39 1/4 x 31 5/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-8

Jessica Todd Smith, The Susan Gray Detweiler Curator of American Art, and Manager, Center for American Art, who organized the exhibition, said: “Modernism changed the way people saw the world around them. Artists pushed their work in new directions, embracing abstraction, while retaining connections to artistic traditions. This exhibition focuses on interrelationships among works of art rather than a single linear narrative. In fact, it gives voice to multiple narratives because the evolution and experimentation in the art of this period is especially fluid. This stylistic pluralism, the beautiful chaos of innovation, was a hallmark of the modern American movement.”

 Modern Times, Alice Neel, Portrait of John with HatPortrait of John with Hat, 1935, by Alice Neel, American, 1900 – 1984. Oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 21 1/2 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of the estate of Arthur M. Bullowa, 1993-119-2.

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, Red and Orange StreakRed and Orange Streak, 1919, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 27 x 23 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987-70-3.

Publication

The exhibition is accompanied by a new publication, American Modernism: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, by Jessica Todd Smith. It is published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press ( 272 pp.) The title of the essay, “Seeing Takes Time” is inspired by a quotation of Georgia O’Keeffe: “Nobody sees a flower—really—it is so small—we haven’t time—and to see takes time . . . “

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, Red Hills and BonesRed Hills and Bones, 1943, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 40 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-109.

Modern Times, Georgia O'Keeffe, From the Lake No. 3From the Lake No. 3, 1924, by Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887 – 1986. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987-70-2.

With 120 color and 10 black-and-white illustrations, American Modernism is the first book to showcase this outstanding aspect of the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which was one of the first major museums in this country to acquire what we now call American Modernism. It tells a story that is unique to the Museum, examining the collection’s development since the 1920s and the role that the city of Philadelphia played in promoting modernism in the first half of the twentieth century. While previous publications have focused on European and American modernism, this one considers what it meant to be American and to be modern, exploring how these artists challenged convention without abandoning recognizable elements from the world around them.

Modern Times, Horace Pippin, The GetawayThe Getaway, 1939, by Horace Pippin, American, 1888 – 1946. Oil on canvas, 24 5/8 x 36 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich II, 2016-3-3.

Modern Times, Man Ray, A.D. 1914A.D. 1914, 1914, by May Ray, American, 1890 – 1976. Oil on canvas, 36 7/8 x 69 3/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1944-90-1.

In addition to focusing on internationally acclaimed artists from the circle of photographer and gallerist Alfred Stieglitz, including Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Charles Sheeler, Smith also considers those who contributed significantly to the art of the United States during their day but have been left outside the mainstream of art history, whether due to their race, gender, or social standing.

Modern Times, Charles Sheeler, Pertaining to Yachts and YachtingPertaining to Yachts and Yachting, 1922, by Charles Sheeler, American, 1883 – 1965. Oil on canvas, 20 x 24 1/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Margaretta S. Hinchman, 1955-96-9.

American Modernism: Highlights from the Philadelphia Museum of Art is now available online via philamuseum.org or in the Museum Store (paper-over-board, $35).

Modern Times, John Sloan, Sixth Avenue and Thirtieth StreetSixth Avenue and Thirtieth Street, 1907, by John Sloan, American, 1871 – 1951. Oil on canvas, 24 1/4 x 32 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Meyer P. Potamkin and Vivian O. Potamkin, 2000. 1964-116-5.

Modern Times, John Sloan, The White WayThe White Way, c. 1926, by John Sloan, American, 1871 – 1951. Oil on canvas, 30 1/8 x 32 1/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Mrs. Cyrus McCormick, 1946-10-2.

Exhibition Location

Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, first floor

 Modern Times, Alfred Stieglitz, The City of AmbitionThe City of Ambition, 1910 (negative); c. 1930 (print), by Alfred Stieglitz, American, 1871 – 1944. Gelatin silver print, image/sheet/mount: 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1949-18-47.

Modern Times, Paul Strand, The Court, New YorkThe Court, New York, 1924 (negative); 1960s (print), by Paul Strand, American, 1890 – 1976. Gelatin silver print, image (sight): 9 1/2 x 7 7/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: The Paul Strand Retrospective Collection, 1915 – 1975, gift of the estate of Paul Strand, 1980-21-42.

Support

This exhibition has been made possible by The Pew Charitable Trusts, The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts, The Annenberg Foundation Fund for Major Exhibitions, The Kathleen C. and John J. F. Sherrerd Fund for Exhibitions, Lyn M. Ross, Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest, The Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Exhibition Fund, The Laura and William C. Buck Endowment for Exhibitions, Leslie Miller and Richard Worley, and two anonymous donors.

Modern Times, Florine Stettheimer, Spring Sale at Bendel'sModern Times, Dox Thrash, DemolitionDemolition, c. 1944, by Dox Thrash, American, 1893 – 1965. Oil on canvas board, 26 x 20 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Katharine Levin Farrell Fund, 2002-97-1.

Exhibition-related education programming was generously supported by the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Social Media
Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/Tumblr/YouTube: @philamuseum

We are Philadelphia’s art museum. A landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Modern Times, Lloyd Ullberg, PSFS Building, PhiladelphiaPSFS Building, Philadelphia, c.1932 – 1933, by Lloyd Ullberg, American, 1904-1996. Gelatin silver print, image and sheet:10 x 7 3/8 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Purchased with the Lola Downin Peck Fund, 1999-121-3.

Modern Times, Artist-maker unknown, Cocktail Shaker with HandleCocktail Shaker with Handle, c.1930s, Artist/maker unknown, American. Chromium, Bakelite, 12 x 6 3/4 x 4 1/4 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of Martina Schaap Yamin, 2013-28-66a,b.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is located on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 26th Street. For general information, call 215-763-8100.

Thank you to the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the content of this post. Click the images for large pictures.

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Studio Tours

Chester County Studio Tour

Chester County Studio Tour

The annual Chester County Studio Tour is May 19th and 20th. This event has become a favorite among art patrons and this year will be no different. We’re hosting 64 local studios with 154 artists exhibiting their art.

Chester and Montgomery County Studio Tours invites friends, families, art enthusiasts and the curious to experience and meet a variety of outstanding artists as they exhibit their work during these two-day events in May and June. This unique and intimate opportunity gives the visitor FREE, unlimited access to the artists and a clearer understanding of their stories and creative processes.

Meet this year’s Chester County artists. May 19th and 20th

Visit our website.

County Collectors Club

This year’s participating artists will be creating one unique 6- x 6- inch piece of original art and selling it for $75.  County Studio Tour wants to make art affordable for everyone and wants to show that art can be everywhere. Whether this is your first time buying original art or you are a seasoned collector, the tour now has something for everyone. In some instances, a favorite artist might be out of someone’s price range, but now with the County Collectors Club, art is within reach. Some art enthusiasts are out of wall space yet enjoy the thrill of adding new art to their collection. This becomes possible with the County Collectors Club since the pieces are considered small. 

County Collectors Club is not an exclusive club and there are no membership fees or dues. Just come out and enjoy our one weekend of open studios. 

All the pieces are uniform in size and framed with a simple, elegant black frame. To assure quality and uniqueness, all pieces will have a specially-marked certificate printed on the back commemorating this year’s studio tour. County Studio Tour is asking the artist to create only one commemorative piece of art, so plan your day and get out early to ensure you have art on your walls by Monday!

County Collectors Club is made possible by the generous support of local businesses.

Montgomery County Open Studio Tour

Curious to meet Montgomery County artists? June 9th and 10th

Visit our website.

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Crane

Spring Open Studios, Crane Arts

Spring Open Studios at Crane Arts and Crane Old School

Crane Arts and the Crane Old School are opening their doors to the public on Saturday, April 21st, 2018 from noon to 6:00pm. Nine galleries and over 30 artist’s studios will be open. That’s a lot of great art to see! For more information Contact info@cranearts.com or 215-232-3203.

Crane Arts

1400 N. American Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19122

Established in 2004, Crane Arts LLC is a unique community that supports the creative production and exhibition of work by both emerging and established artists.

Galleries

ICEBOX | CRANE TENANT GALLERY | PPAC | INDIGO ARTS | FJORD TSA | SPILLWAY COLLECTIVE | INLIQUID | SECOND STATE PRESS

NOTE: MOST GALLERIES ARE OPEN WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY 12-6PM OR BY APPOINTMENT. PLEASE CHECK GALLERY WEBSITES TO CONFIRM CURRENT HOURS.

Crane Old School

The Crane Old School is home to many artists and organizations including Pig Iron Theatre Company. Located at 1417 N. 2nd Street. Philadelphia, PA, 19122

“The mission of Pig Iron Theatre Company is to expand what is possible in performance by creating rigorous and unusual ensemble-devised works; by training the next generation of daring, innovative theatre artists; and by consistently asking the hardest questions, both in our art and in its relation to the world around us.”

Crane Building History

200710_history01

The Crane Company Building was built in 1905 out of cast concrete faced with brick in the Kensington warehouse and manufacturing area just north of Girard Avenue. It was designed by Philadelphia architect Walter Ballinger, an early innovator of concrete building techniques. The long wedge-shaped building was used as a plumbing warehouse, and had an adjacent three-story stable for delivery vehicles and draft horses. It was later used to process frozen seafood. The enormous concrete-block, first-floor addition which functioned as a walk-in freezer now serves as the Ice Box Project Space.

Join Icebox Projects Mailing List
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Air

Lois Schlachter, Jed Williams Gallery

Spring’s in the Air, Lois Schlachter, Jed Williams Gallery

 

Spring’s in the Air, Lois Schlachter: April 7th – 22nd, 2018

Jed Williams Gallery, 615 Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19147

Artist Reception: April 7th, 2018, 5:00 – 7:00pm.

JED WILLIAMS GALLERY is excited to celebrate the coming of Spring with its new exhibit, a solo showcase of painter Lois Schlachter. Let’s bring Spring in, in style! With Lois Schlachter’s exuberant, colorful work dHer unique abstracts have a meticulously composed, “clean” feel to them, which goes hand in hand with a wonderful sense of compositional whimsy and a mellifluous, subtle color schemes. The distinctive geometric shapes set off eternally revolving fractal-like hues.

According to Lois Schlachter, “Her paintings at Jed Williams Gallery are examples of her love of geometric shapes and bold vibrant color. These pieces were created by letting her subconscious mind guide her hand. She works directly on the canvas, continually drawing throughout the painting process. The use of line and color help to navigate the viewer across the canvas providing an avenue to discover one fun spot after another.”

Lois Schlachter, Jed Williams GalleryTravel Dreams, Lois Schlachter, acrylic on canvas

This painting is “Travel Dreams” and will be on display at Jed Williams Gallery. How do I do whatI do? I start by heavily coating the canvas. Then, whatever paint is left on my pallet from my previous painting I start applying it to the canvas. I am not really thinking about anything, I’m just having fun. It’s kind of like doodling. Sometimes I’ll splatter the paint and let it run. It is all very loose. Most of the time, I have no preconceived plan or idea. I allow my subconscious mind to wonder. I go to the part of myself that is the child, uninhibited and painting to please myself. Sometimes I get lucky and it starts to look like something. – Lois Schlachter

Lois Schlachter, Jed Williams GalleryFeathered Friends, Lois Schlachter, acrylic on canvas

Lois Schlachter, Jed Williams GalleryGuardian Angels, Lois Schlachter, acrylic on canvas

This piece is “Guardian Angels”. With all three paintings, early on, they started to look like something. At this point, it’s time to get serious and I really start to work the line. The more that I work in a geometric format, the more I understand that shapes and lines are related and it is up to me to find that relationship. It’s time to work the color, balance the forms, study the positive and negative spaces and get a rhythm going. Depending on the size of the piece, I have likely been working for a few weeks and there are many more weeks of work ahead. – Lois Schlachter

About Lois Schlachter

Lois Schlachter is a graduate of The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and Philadelphia College of Art now the University of the Arts. She is a prolific painter working primarily in acrylic and considers herself as an Abstract Expressionist. Previous exhibitions include GoggleWorks’ “Artists Equity” Show (Reading, PA, 2013). In 2014 she received four Special Recognition Awards in the “16th Annual Contemporary Art Juried Online International Art Exhibition” hosted by Upstream People Gallery.

About Jed Williams Gallery

Jed Williams Gallery is a unique art space owned and operated since 2010 by artist Jed Williams. In it Jed Williams showcases up and coming and inspiring artists from the local area including Jed Williams himself, along with providing a look into the workings of an actual artist studio. The gallery shows a variety of thoughtful, cutting edge works in various media with a focus on abstract painting and mixed medium.

Jed Williams Gallery also involves the community through art workshops, as well as local music and fashion talents with free music events, parties, trunk shows. Jed Williams Gallery is part of the revitalization of Bainbridge St., just one block south of South St. It aims to contribute to the vitality and unique, fun spirit of Bainbridge St. and the Queen Village/Bella Vista neighborhood.

Jed Williams Gallery has shown local talents such as Kevin Broad, Lorraine Glessner, Dennis Flynn, David Stanley Aponte, and more.  The gallery has also collaborated with social/art non-profit organizations such as Philly Stewards, InLiquid, Project HOME, and Art Sphere, Inc., other art venues such as the Hex Factory, and curators such as Sean Stoops and Anna Cherniahivsky.

Thank you to Lois Schlachter and Jed Williams for the content of this post.

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Elementos

Yehoshua Villarreal I, RACSOAIRE, Yehoshua Villarreal I, oil, acrylic, gold leaf, 96″ x 48″

ELEMENTOS

Tierra, Aire, Fuego, and Agua by Yehoshua Villarreal I

Opening reception Thursday, March 15 at RACSO Art Gallery

WHAT: Philadelphia’s leading Latin American Art gallery is premiering a new
series of paintings by award-winning artist Yehoshua Villarreal I . Elementos |
Tierra, Aire, Fuego, and Agua explores the subjects of earth, air, fire, and water in
Villarreal’s unique style of figurative images and structural compositions which
complement and complete each other in this series.

Yehoshua Villarreal I was born in Venezuela and moved to Miami in 1996.
Villarreal’s paintings are in museums, private and corporate collections
and he exhibits internationally.

“Yehoshua’s work is an exercise in provocative juxtaposition – the
imaginative and allegorical subjects challenge the precision and control of
his techniques,” shared RACSO Gallery owner Oscar Villamil.

RACSO Art Gallery represents local and international Latin artists.

WHO: Available for interviews and photographs – Miami based artist Yehoshua Villarreal I and RACSO Art Gallery Owner Oscar Villamil

WHEN: Thursday, March 15 | Opening Reception 6:00pm – 8:00pm

WHERE: RACSO Art Gallery | 1935 East Passyunk Avenue | Philadelphia, Pa
Exhibition Dates and Times | March 15 – April 15, 2018
Monday andTuesday 10:00AM – 5:00PM | Wednesday through Friday 10:00AM –
9:00PM Saturday 4:00 – 9:00PM | Sunday by appointment at 215.735.3515

ABOUT RACSO ART GALLERY | www.racsogallery.art
RACSO Art Gallery exclusively represents Latin American artists. Dealing in
emerging local and international contemporary Latin American art as well as the
‘Modern Masters’ of Latin American art including Botero and Villegas. Located at
the gateway to East Passyunk Avenue in the heart of South Philadelphia,
collectors can experience a range of works including paintings, drawings, prints,
sculpture, and photography. RACSO Art Gallery celebrates the beauty of the Latin
American art spirit with rotating exhibitions throughout the year.

INSTAGRAM @RACSO_Gallery | FACEBOOK @RacsoGallery

Thank you to Tara Theune Davis taratheunedavis@gmail.com for the content of this post.

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