Category Archives: Prints

Art prints by Philadeelphia area artists

Vlisco

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global StagePrinted Textile, 2005. Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, founded 1846. Cotton plain weave, wax‑resist print, 12 feet × 47 1/2 inches (365.8 × 120.7 cm). Private Collection, ©Vlisco

Creative Africa, Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global Stage, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Through January 22, 2017

Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building

The Philadelphia Museum of Art celebrates West and Central African fashion and culture in an exhibition exploring the classic and contemporary looks of Vlisco, the oldest international textile brand that specializes in Dutch wax fabrics. From the earliest designs and most recognizable patterns, continuing through a selection of iconic styles that have been re-interpreted in a contemporary way, the exhibition will highlight a selection of the thousands of patterns Vlisco has produced for the African and diaspora markets.

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global StagePrinted Textile, 2005. Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, founded 1846. Cotton plain weave, wax‑resist print, 12 feet × 47 1/2 inches (365.8 × 120.7 cm). Private Collection, ©Vlisco

Dilys Blum, The Museum’s Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and organizer of this exhibition, said: “The wax-printed fabrics long associated with Central and West Africa have a surprising history that is truly global.  Many of the patterns shown in this display tell stories and convey images that reflect Africa’s past and reimagine its future. For this special presentation in Philadelphia, we are celebrating the transnational character of Vlisco by showing the company’s classic designs, these classics re-imagined, and new contemporary patterns, sharing how fashion designers in West Africa and other parts of the world use Vlisco wax fabrics today.”

When cloth leaves the factory it is generally identified only by a stock number. The women who trade in the open-air markets in African cities, and their customers, assign the patterns names inspired by current events, politics, religion, and material culture. The exhibition explores the ways in which such patterns acquire social meaning, status, and value and become culturally assimilated into African society, and examine how designs can have many interpretations depending on where they are used.

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global StagePrinted Textile, Late 20th century. Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, founded 1846. Cotton plain weave, wax‑resist print, 36 × 47 1/2 inches (91.4 × 120.7 cm). Private Collection, © Vlisco

Among the classic patterns represented are the “Happy Family” egg motif, featuring an image of a hen surrounded by her chicks and chicks-to-be referencing the importance of family, and the “Fallen Tree” pattern that acts as a visual substitute for a proverb that teaches unity and strength in Ghana. The “Alphabet” design symbolizes the value that Africans place on education, and “Swallows”, a symbol of good luck, refers to the transience of riches. The classic “Swallows” pattern was worn by flight attendants for Air Afrique in the 1970s. The display will show how this particular pattern has been reinterpreted to include airplane imagery, a symbol of globalization.

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global Stage“La Famille” Printed Textile, 1952. Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, founded 1846. Cotton plain weave, wax‑resist print, 18 feet × 47 1/4 inches (548.6 × 120 cm). Private Collection, © Vlisco

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global Stage“Angelina” Printed Textile, 1962. Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, founded 1846. Cotton plain weave, wax‑resist print, 70 × 48 1/4 inches (177.8 × 122.6 cm). Private Collection, © Vlisco

The “Eye” pattern, one of the most enduring European designs for the African market, appears in the exhibition in multiple variations and colors.  The original design of 1904 by the Haarlem Cotton Company was inspired by the Egyptian god Horus, a symbol of protection, royal power, and good health.  Some of the eye patterns were intended to silently communicate and identify with a woman’s family and marital relationships.  In Nigeria, the original Haarlem pattern is known as “Eyes”. In Côte d’Ivoire, it is called “Bull’s Eye” and is worn by a woman to show a man that she desires him.  Also in Côte d’Ivoire, the classic “Jumping Horse” pattern expresses rivalry between co-wives.  In Nigeria, Igbo women favor this design for family to express unity at their annual women’s meeting.

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global StageDazzling Graphics Collection, 2011, Made by Vlisco, Helmond, Netherlands, Photograph courtesy of Vlisco

The exhibition will touch upon the rise of the most successful market women in Togo, called the Nana Benz, who traded in wax prints beginning in the 1930s. The Nana Benz were essential to the success or failure of the designs.  Wholesalers to other market traders, the women provided Vlisco agents with information on customer preferences. In return, the women were often given exclusive access to certain designs.  A playful design featuring the Mercedes-Benz three-pointed star logo pays homage to these traders, as this was their car of choice and became a symbol of their success.  In another design, the Vlisco logo on the radiator grill replaces the car’s original trademark. 

Displayed on mannequins in the center of the gallery is an installation of contemporary designs using the wax fabrics as created by African, diaspora and other international designers. 

One of Nigeria’s foremost fashion designers, Lanre da Silva Ajayi, who is known for her ultra-feminine looks and elegant use of prints, has collaborated with Vlisco on numerous projects including a gala dress on view in the exhibition.  The designer’s ensemble is made in a limited-edition shimmering gold print embellished with the designer’s signature beads and sequins.

Owner and creative director Araba Stephens Akompi of the Ghanaian fashion house Stylista has reconfigured patterns showing a Spanish fan to create a flamenco-style dress with a distinctively African twist. Stylista sees this gala dress as an evolution of the traditional Ghanaian blouse with a matching skirt.

The exhibition features ensembles by Vlisco’s senior fashion designer from 2008 to 2016, Inge van Lierop, who was responsible for translating each seasonal concept into stylish ensembles used for marketing. A strapless, two-piece wedding dress made from two color ways of the same design is embellished with beads, as is the veil, which was embroidered in India. Deconstructed and made into a late 1960s-style mini dress that pays homage to the decade when the design first achieved popularity, the classic “Angelina” pattern associated with the dashiki a loose tunic worn by men and women is updated and re-colored in luminous pastels for a more contemporary look.

The fashions of Manish Arora, one of today’s most inspiring designers, fuse his Indian roots, global style, and contemporary popular culture.  This year, Arora has collaborated with Vlisco for his ready-to-wear collection shown recently in Paris and inspired by the American West.  For his ensemble on display, he has re-interpreted wax prints into knit fabrics. 

Ikiré Jones of Philadelphia, led by Nigerian-American menswear designer, Walé Oyéjidé, shows how the designs can be creatively cut and mixed together for unique looks.  His  hand-tailored trousers, and a jacket made of Vlisco fabric, are accessorized with a storytelling scarf.

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global Stage

Vlisco: African Fashion on a Global Stage is one of five exhibitions in the Perelman Building this season, accompanied by related programs that feature a broad spectrum of the arts from across the African continent. They feature historical works of art as well as contemporary fashion, photography, design, and architecture. Each calls attention to the continuities and differences between African art forms over the centuries.

The related exhibitions are:

Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art, a major exhibition drawn from the collection of the Penn Museum (May 14 through December 4, 2016).

Threads of Tradition, focusing on the traditional patterns in West and Central African textiles and the techniques used to create them, including strip weaving, resist dyeing, piecing, appliqué, and embroidery (Through January 2017).

The Architecture of Francis Kéré: Building for Community, featuring a site-specific, immersive environment designed by this world-renowned Burkina-Faso-born architect (May 14–September 25, 2016).

Three Photographers/Six Cities presents an in-depth look at three photographers who create powerful pictures of African cities: Cairo, Egypt; Nairobi, Kenya; Lagos, Nigeria; Johannesburg, South Africa; Bamako, and Tombouctou (Timbuktu), Mali. From Akinbode Akinbiyi’s observation of urban centers and Seydou Camara’s examination of Islamic manuscripts to Ananias Léki Dago’s pictures of offbeat locales, the images offer unique perspectives on contemporary African experience (Through September 25, 2016).

Curator: Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles

Location: Joan Spain Gallery

About Vlisco

Vlisco, founded in 1846, began exporting factory printed cloth to West Africa around 1876. Over the years Vlisco absorbed several Dutch textile manufacturers that also produced wax prints for the market prior to World War I. Today it is the last surviving European wax-resist textile manufacturer. The Vlisco brand is manufactured in Helmond, Netherlands and is the premier brand of the Vlisco group which includes three other brands, GTP and Woodin made in Ghana and Uniwax produced in Cote d’Ivoire. Each brand caters to a distinct segment of the market.

Social Media: #CreativeAfrica 

Follow us and join the conversation: Twitter/Facebook/Instagram/Tumblr/YouTube @philamuseum

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is Philadelphia’s art museum. We are a landmark building. A world-renowned collection. A place that welcomes everyone. We bring the arts to life, inspiring visitors—through scholarly study and creative play—to discover the spirit of imagination that lies in everyone. We connect people with the arts in rich and varied ways, making the experience of the Museum surprising, lively, and always memorable. We are committed to inviting visitors to see the world—and themselves—anew through the beauty and expressive power of the arts.

Thank you to The Philadelphia Museum of Art for the content of this post.

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Jazz

Live Philly Jazz – Through the Photographic LensEmannuel Ohemeng, Esperanza Spalding at the Keswick Theatre, photography

Philadelphia City Hall Exhibits Celebrate Jazz and Photography

Live Philly JazzThrough the Photographic Lens February 29 – May 6, 2016

Juror: Stephen Perloff

Art Gallery at City Hall, Room 116. Second Floor, NE corner display cases

The Clef Club at 50 through May 6, 2016

Curators: Don Gardner and Lovett Hines from The Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts

Jazz returns to City Hall this spring with two photography exhibits: Live Philly Jazz – Through the Photographic Lens, a juried exhibited located in the Art Gallery at City Hall; and The Clef Club at 50, which is located on the second floor near the Office of the Mayor. The exhibits will coincide with Philadelphia Jazz Appreciation Month in April. A joint reception will take place on March 28, from 4:00 – 6:00 pm.

Live Philly Jazz was juried by Stephen Perloff, editor of The Photo Review, a nationally recognized journal of photography that began in 1976. A call for photography was sent out in the fall, asking artists to submit work that captures the spirit of jazz during live performances, or subtle behind-the-scenes creative moments. The aim was to acquire original works of art that show a mastery of the photographic medium, depicting the rhythms, sounds, energy, and intricacies of jazz music.

Mr. Perloff selected 32 photographs: “At the heart of jazz is performance, which is reflected in a majority of the images in this exhibition that capture a wide range of performers from some of the jazz greats to street musicians.”

Juror’s Statement

Jazz may be the most quintessential American art form. From its birth in New Orleans it has spread like kudzu throughout the United States and around the world. And it has influenced all other succeeding forms of music from the blues to rock and roll and beyond. At the heart of jazz is performance, which is reflected in a majority of the images in this exhibition that capture a wide range of performers from some of the jazz greats to street musicians. There are many fine images among these. But I’m also heartened to see images that go beyond performance, from details such as Peter Applebaum’s Mr. Hornblower, whose lined fingers with glistening rings hold a battered horn that reflects years of playing; to Gerald Cyrus’s Freddie on Fire, which bursts with the pure energy of intense music making; to the composites of Regina Schlitz’s Jamaaladeen Tacuma Upright Abstract and Melissa Teasley’s Jazz-N-Around City Hall Sax Throwback; and even to Lynn Goldstein’s Beat Out of Box, a mostly abstract picture that captures the gestural quality and the balance between structure and improvisation of jazz. Philadelphia has its own rich jazz history and also a wonderful group of photographers who have managed to portray jazz’s soul. – Stephen PerloffThe Photo Review, Editor

Participating photographers:

  • Peter Appelbaum
  • Steven Berry
  • Rachel Bliss
  • Matt Cohen
  • Blinky Comix
  • Elliott Curson
  • Gerald Cyrus
  • Dean Anthony
  • David Dzubinski
  • Meredith Edlow
  • Peter Fitzpatrick
  • Annarita Gentile
  • Melissa Gilstrap
  • Lynne Goldstein
  • Alan Jackman
  • Leandre Jackson
  • Alonzo Jennings
  • Rob Lybeck
  • Jeff Lynch
  • Bill May
  • James McWilliams
  • Brian Mengini
  • D. Jacob Miller
  • Sarah Nathan
  • Emmanuel Ohemeng
  • Luzselenia Salas
  • David Simpson
  • Sound Evidence
  • Melissa Teasley
  • Bruce Turner

Live Philly Jazz – Through the Photographic LensRob Lybeck, Pat Martino, photograph

For 50 years, The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts has been an enduring cultural hub for Philadelphia’s jazz community. Art In City Hall, with the help of Don Gardner and Lovett Hines, the club’s respective Executive Director and Artistic Director, is presenting this extraordinary triumph through a display of photographs and memorabilia from the club’s collection. The Clef Club at 50 features images of past jazz legends that have graced Philadelphia’s jazz scene and some of the people who helped make it all happen. Many of the photographs on display were taken by South Philly’s John T. “Bunky” deVechhis, who passed away last year after decades of capturing Philly’s jazz scene.

Brief History:

The Clef Club began in 1966 as the social club for Union Local 274 of the American Federation of Musicians – Philadelphia’s black musicians’ union created in the mid 30s by Frank Fairfax. At the time of its incorporation, over seven hundred musicians were members of the club; including: Nina Simone, John Coltrane, Shirley Scott, Philly Joe Jones, the Heath Brothers, Butch Ballard, and Dizzy Gillespie among others. Other luminaries such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Art Blakely, Sara Vaughn, Max Roach and Clifford Brown would be frequent performers.

In 1971, Local 274 disbanded, but The Clef Club endured. In 1978 it expanded its mission to include jazz performance, jazz instruction, and the preservation of Philadelphia’s rich jazz history. It changed its name to The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts. In the 1980s, the William Penn Foundation – led by its Executive Director, Dr. Bernard Watson – allocated $2.8 million to construct a new facility at 738 South Broad Street, as part of the development of cultural organizations on the Avenue of the Arts. The state added an additional $1 million. Ground was broken in 1994 and the club opened its doors the following year.

Today, The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts houses a performance hall that can seat over 200 patrons, and contains two levels of classrooms and practice studios for its educational programs. It boasts some of today’s finest jazz musicians as former students, and continues to present world-class performances in its mission to celebrate and preserve the legacy of jazz.

The Photo Review

The Photo Review is a critical journal of national scope and international readership. Publishing since 1976, The Photo Review covers photography events throughout the country and serves as a central resource for the Mid-Atlantic region. Editor Stephen Perloff, a respected writer, educator and photographer, has been interviewed for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Bucks County Courier Times, and Art Matters. He has received two critic’s fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. For more information on The Photo Review, please visit: http://www.photoreview.org/

The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts

Jazz is a true, original American art form and The Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz and Performing Arts, in Philadelphia, is the first facility ever constructed specifically as a jazz institution – a testament to our national’s history. Located on the Avenue of the Arts at 738 South Broad St, the building houses a 240 seat performance hall, in addition to multiple classrooms and practice studios, making it ideally suited to fulfill its mission of celebrating and preserving the legacy of jazz. For more information, please visit:

http://clefclubofjazz.org/

Art in City Hall

Art in City Hall brings the people’s art to the people’s building, establishing a presence for the visual arts in one of the city’s most important civic spaces, and provides space for the local cultural community to display their work. City Hall showcases juried exhibits of professional artists, local artists, arts and cultural institutions, community organizations and schools that utilize the arts in their programming. Encompassing a variety of mediums, techniques, and subjects, the program is committed to presenting a diversity of ideas and artistic explorations. For additional information on Art in City Hall,

Creative Philadelphia — City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy

The mission of the Creative Philadelphia — City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy is to support and promote arts, culture and the creative industries; and to develop partnerships and coordinate efforts that weave arts, culture and creativity into the economic and social fabric of the City. For more information on the OACCE, visit: http://www.creativephl.org.

Thank you to Tu Huynh, City Hall Exhibitions Manager, Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy for the content of this post. Thank you to Rob Lybeck for sharing his photograph.

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Objet D’art

Objet D'art: Photography Exhibition, Church St. Art & Craft Gallery of Mt Holly, NJ, Jeff Stroud

Objet D’ Art, Group Photography Exhibition at Church St. Art & Craft Gallery, Curator Jeff Stroud

Call to all local photographers! March Photography Exhibition Church St. Art & Craft Gallery of Mt Holly, NJ, has invited me to curate this year’s photography exhibition which will be held in March 2016. The theme this year is:  Objet D’ Art:  A small object that is valued because it is beautiful or interesting; an object that artist value.

The theme here is to show your creative artistic side by exhibiting small objects you find in your home, everyday object you use or collection, or any small found objects that catch your imagination while creating a single image of fine art.

Drop off dates Feb 26-28th during business hours WednesdayFriday 11-6:00 pm, Saturday 10-6:00 pm. Sunday 12-4:00 pm 

There is a $10 submission fee.  You may submit up to 3 photographs, framed and properly wired for hanging.  The show will run from March 2nd through the 26th and we will be holding a meet the artists reception on March 12th from 4:00 – 6:00 pm. Open to the public and there will be refreshments served.

I look forward to hearing from you as well as curating this exhibition. You are welcome to invite friends and share this post with other photographers.

Objet D’art: Photography Exhibition, the exhibit for the month of March at Church St. Art & Craft Gallery will be non-juried and curated by our guest photographer Jeff Stroud.

Theme: Objet D’ Art:  A small object that is valued because it is beautiful or interesting; an object that artists value. 

“The theme here is to show your creative artistic side by exhibiting small objects you can find in your home, everyday object you use or collect or small found object that catch your imagination while creating a single image of fine art with blurred/bokeh background.” – Jeff Stroud

Objet D'art: Photography Exhibition, Church St. Art & Craft Gallery of Mt Holly, NJ, Jeff StroudFor any questions regarding the theme or medium, please contact Jeff at jeffstroud.52@gmail.com

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Moment

John D. Taylor, SAVERY GalleryUntitled #69, woodcut, 2013. John D. Taylor, Just a Moment at SAVERY Gallery

Just a Moment, solo exhibition of new prints by John D. Taylor

at SAVERY Gallery

SAVERY Gallery proudly announces the opening of Just a Moment, a solo exhibition of new prints by John D. Taylor.

Opening Friday December 4th, 2015, the exhibition will run through January 3rd, 2016 with a reception for the artist on Friday, December 4th from 6-9 PM.

Just a Moment is a cool and lyrical display in black and white notes on paper that echo the methods wherein they are born, the hand that crafts them, and the Artist’s search for discovery in the process. In her essay on the exhibition, Associate Curator at the University of Pennsylvania Heather Gibson Moqtaderi is witness to the following:

“An undercurrent of mystery courses through ‘Just a Moment’, from Taylor’s cryptic markings to ethereal spaces that feel like windows, portals, or pathways. Untitled #69 invokes the spirit of Robert Motherwell’s Open paintings, albeit in a very different manner, with a three-sided window shape that seemingly continues beyond the page. Taylor’s “window” is all the more enigmatic when paired with the ghostly, darkly inked shape floating nearby. Through these unfamiliar spaces, Taylor leads us to uncharted territory and asks that we make our own meaning.”

Comprised of about 40 Print works framed by the Artist’s own hand in the same rich woods in which he works: ebonized poplar, mahogany and maple, this exhibition is a study in time / tempo / texture and moments. The works themselves are a conversation in contrasts between Taylor’s loose, gestural style, his expressive influences, and his meticulous printing methods. In these woodcuts, texture from the chisel and the wood grain add character to his minimalist compositions, giving lightness and depth to the shapes he creates. His work is at some times clean, almost geometric, and at other times seemingly impulsive and improvisational in its mark making.

Freed from the focus of running an edition, each of Taylor’s prints are unique: meant to capture a moment and hold it for a second until passing into the next. Having succeeded that way, the Artist must move on to the “next now”.

John D. Taylor, SAVERY GalleryUntitled #24, woodcut, 2014, John D. Taylor, Just a Moment at SAVERY Gallery

John D. Taylor is an Artist, Cabinetmaker, Father, and longtime resident of West Philadelphia and Powelton Village. After studying painting at Cleveland Institute of Art in the mid 1960’s, he relocated to Philadelphia to study with Piero Dorazio and Angello Savelli at the University of Pennsylvania. He has long been integrated with the University and the Philadelphia art scene: first as a gallery preparatory at the Institute for Contemporary Art, and currently at the Arthur Ross Gallery where he has headed the installation crew for the past 30 years. He is a prolific artist, creating work in his shop and studio everyday and exhibiting most recently in his 2010 solo exhibition “Current Prints” at Art on the Avenue.

John D. Taylor, SAVERY GalleryUntitled #18, woodcut, 2015, John D. Taylor, Just a Moment at SAVERY Gallery

John D. Taylor, SAVERY GalleryUntitled #55, woodcut, 2015, John D. Taylor, Just a Moment at SAVERY Gallery

Just a Moment is Mr. Taylor’s first solo exhibition at SAVERY Gallery. For further questions, press inquiries, or images please contact: SAVERY GALLERY, 319 N. 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA,

Tory Savery or Caitlin Palmer 267-687-7769 or 610-547-8434 gallery@saverydesign.com www.saverygallery.com

Thank you to SAVERY Gallery for the content of this post.

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Paths

Deirdre Murphy, URBNDeirdre Murphy – Migratory Paths at URBN at the Navy Yard

Deirdre Murphy – Migratory Paths at URBN

Written and photographed by Laura Storck

The concept of the symbiotic relationship between art and science is nothing new – many would affirm that it has been in existence since the dawn of time. Many artists and scientists (perhaps one in the same?) have studied the relationships and potential intersections of these phenomena (DaVinci, Seurat, and Hershel, to name a few).

Deirdre Murphy, URBNDeirdre Murphy – Migratory Paths at URBN at the Navy Yard

The brain ambidexterity that informs the esoteric outlook of those fortunate enough to possess those qualities still pervades. Deirdre Murphy is a contemporary artist whose work is influenced by the connections between art and science, as can be seen by one of her current exhibitions, “Migratory Paths”, is currently on view  at URBN at the Navy Yard.  This series explores the migratory flight patterns of birds and how they may be affected by climate change.  Her abstract works are extremely eye-catching, attractive, and thought-provoking her with use of bright colors, geometric shapes, and repetition.

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory Paths

Deirdre MurphyThe Boundless (2012)_silkscreen and mixed media on paper, at URBN at the Navy Yard

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Laura StorckDeirdre Murphy,  Synchronized Formation (2012), silkscreen and mixed media on paper, at URBN at the Navy Yard

According to a recent interview with PennDesign about a summer residency a Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Ms. Murphy explained that:

“The collective intelligence of flocking birds and the unpredictable patters have been a source of inspiration to me.  I wanted to work directly with the Hawk Mountain Scientists and ask the how global warming has changed the raptors migratory flight patterns and then to see how I might translate that information into paintings.”

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory Paths
Deirdre MurphySentinel II (2008), oil on canvas, at URBN at the Navy Yard

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory PathsDeirdre Murphy, Flamingo, 2008, oil on canvas, at URBN at the Navy Yard

In case you weren’t aware,  I should mention that I’m an artist and scientist myself. I have a great fondness for the use of bold pigments, as well as a natural affinity towards the cleanliness and mechanics of simple lines and angular structures.  This sensibility applies not only in my personal design preferences and photographic compositions, but in life itself.

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory Paths
Nocturnal Migration (2010), silkscreen on paper, Deirdre Murphyat URBN at the Navy Yard

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory PathsDeirdre MurphyLibra (2015), gouache on paper

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory PathsPigeon Flight (2009), oil on canvas, Deirdre Murphy at URBN at the Navy Yard

I engaged with this beautifully celestial and otherworldly exhibit on it’s opening day, and after some pondering, I concluded that “Migratory Paths” not only applies to migratory patterns of birds, but to all lifeforms. To my chagrin, I had received a polite yet disappointing email that day that I did not land a coveted job that I desperately wanted, also located at the Navy Yard, and was feeling quite crestfallen.  On that bright and warm afternoon, Ms. Murphy’s art spoke to my resilient self in URBN’s sleek headquarters, and expressed to me that nature endures, perseveres, and maneuvers along it’s own migratory path,  and we must follow our instincts to find our way.

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory PathsDeirdre Murphy at URBN at the Navy Yard

I highly recommend everyone to take a flight of fancy to URBN to see this exhibit in this amazing and ethereal space. Enjoy a light lunch at Shop 543 or a warm cup of java at Jharoka while taking a gander at the Ms. Murphy’s artwork with the zen feeling of the nearby koi pond just a few steps away. “Migratory Paths” are works on paper that span from 2010-2015 and will be on display at URBN until December 7, 2015.

Deirdre Murphy, URBN, Migratory PathsDeirdre MurphyDome of the Sky (2010), silkscreen on paper, at URBN at the Navy Yard

Written and photographed by Laura Storck

Laura Storck Photography ARTIST. SCIENTIST. PHOTOGRAPHER. ROCK STAR.: https://laurastorck.wordpress.com/

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Twitter: @Laura_Storck

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