Tag Archives: Philadelphia Artist

Prime

Prime Time, Maureen, Maureen Gass-Brown, New Watercolors

Prime Time, Maureen Gass-Brown, New Watercolors,

Church St. Art & Craft

Join us for the month of April as we welcome spring with “Prime Time” a delightful floral watercolor exhibit by member artist, Maureen Gass-Brown.

An opening reception will be held on April 8th from 4:00 – 7:00pm. There will be a special discount on all unframed originals that will only be offered during the reception!

As always, artful refreshments will be served and everyone is welcome.

Church St. Art & Craft, 2 Church St., Mt. Holly, NJ in the Historic Mill Race Village of Shops,

609-261-8634

Prime Time, Maureen Gass-Brown, New Watercolors, Church St. Art & Craft

Church St. Art & Craft is an eclectic art space. We are a cooperative art gallery in the historic Mill Race Village in Mt. Holly, NJ. We are a custom frame shop, a place to gather and create art and a shop to purchase charming hand made gifts. In short, a wonderfully creative place to visit!

Like Church St. Art & Craft on facebook

SEO and Photoshop by DoN.

Like DoNArTNeWs Philadelphia Art News Blog on facebook

Follow the new DoNArTNeWs.com

Follow DoN on Twitter @DoNNieBeat58

DoN Brewer on Pinterest

@donniebeat on Instagram

Affiliate Marketing [disclosure page] Shop on-line and help support DoNArTNeWs

Picket

“PICKET FENCES” BY TEXTUAL ARTIST GERARD SILVA

ART GALLERY AT WILLIAM WAY LGBT CENTER DEBUTS

“PICKET FENCES” BY TEXTUAL ARTIST GERARD SILVA

Solo Exhibition  Features 26 Works on Paper through April 28, 2017

Picket Fences,” a solo exhibition by textual artist Gerard Silva, made its debut at the Art Gallery at the William Way Center on March 10 and runs through April 28, 2017.

Each of the exhibition’s 26 works on paper has been hand-printed by Silva and culled from a larger group in his “Picket Fences” series, serving a symbol of the way we choose what parts of ourselves to present to a society that makes judgements of approval or disapproval, of acceptance or rejection. While Silva strives for perfection, the hand-printing process produces slight variations that he can’t help but leave for the viewer to pass their judgements on.

“These screen prints relate to our daily lives in which we strive for acceptance; we are selective and we seek some kind of perfection in ourselves and in others,” Silva explains. “And it is this search for perfection in the many roles we all play that leads to insecurities that we have a difficult time admitting to or sharing with someone: insecurities that I’m acknowledging here.  But ultimately, I am who I am.  We are who we are.”

This project originated from the artist’s own frustrations and discouragement while working in his studio, often resulting in insecurities and self-doubt that spilled over into the many other roles in his life: a son, a friend, a gay man, a minority, a citizen, an outcast, a non-white, a non-black, a punk, a skeptic, a sinner, a foreigner, an American.

When pondering how he measures up, Silva’s collective work asks, “Is there a perfect state of being out there? Is the grass greener on the other side? Where is my white picket fence?”

Silva is a Philadelphia-based artist who has studied in New York, London and Arizona. His work has been shown in the Meyerson Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania, at the Kingston Gallery in Boston, at the San Diego Art Institute and at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico. He was also included twice in the Arizona Biennial.

The William Way Center is open Monday through Friday from 11:00am -10:00pm and on Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00pm – 5:00pm.  Admission to the main floor gallery is free.

The William Way LGBT Center is located at: 1315 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

215-732-2220

PICKET FENCES” is showing the following 15” x 22” works on paper:

PERFECT

WHITE

LATINO

PRETTY

PHONY

LUCKY

ESTABLISHED

PREEMINENT

COMMERCIAL

IMPORTANT

RICH

PROMISCUOUS

OLD

EMERGING

POOR

SERIOUS

WILD

BLACK

YOUNG

MAN

FABULOUS

QUEER

FUCKED-UP

BUTCH

CONNECTED

ANGRY

Thank you to Jolyn for the content of this post.

Like William Way LGBT Community Center on facebook

SEO and Photoshop by DoN.

Like DoNArTNeWs Philadelphia Art News Blog on facebook

Follow the new DoNArTNeWs.com

Follow DoN on Twitter @DoNNieBeat58

DoN Brewer on Pinterest

@donniebeat on Instagram

Affiliate Marketing [disclosure page] Shop on-line and help support DoNArTNeWs

Food

How Food Moves: Edible LogisticsImage: Amber Art and Design, Corner Store Project

How Food Moves: Edible Logistics

Amber Art & Design / Ryan Griffis & Sarah Ross
Brian Holmes / Otabenga Jones & Associates / Cynthia Main
Claire PentecostPhilly Stake / Stephanie Rothenberg
Candice Smith with Freedom Arts / Kristen Neville Taylor

Daniel Tucker, Guest Curator, Graduate Program Director in Social and Studio Practices at Moore College of Art and Design
March 27 – May 27, 2017
Public Program and Reception: Thursday, March 30, 2017, 6:00 – 8:30pm
Our public program begins at 6:00 pm followed by the reception
Rowan University Art Gallery, 301 High Street West, First Floor, Glassboro, NJ 08028
Admission to the gallery and reception is free and open to the public.
The public program begins at 6:00 pm, led by guest curator Daniel Tucker in dialogue on art, geography, and agricultural planning with Professor Megan Bucknum Ferrigno from Rowan University’s School of Geography and Environment, and with exhibiting artists.

Artists explore the US food supply chain and its complex patterns of distribution in between the point of origin (the farm) and its point of consumption (the plate). The exhibition aims to highlight the work of contemporary artists grappling with the complexity of this movement through multi-media, research-based, and participatory practices that focus a lens on the social and industrial impacts of migrant workers, food justice movements, immigration, multiculturalism, and economic disparities. This project builds upon Tucker’s event series, Moving Units: Where Food & Economy Converge. A companion booklet, produced by Rowan University Art Gallery, serves to provide a general overview of US food supply chains. It includes descriptions of the artist contributions to the exhibition that relate to each step on the chain. Throughout this booklet you read about an approach to geographic education that values connecting with the world outside the classroom. The booklet was researched and written by Megan Bucknum Ferrigno, part-time faculty member of Rowan University’s Department of Geography, Planning and Sustainability. Additional contributions made by Dr. Chuck McGlynn, Dr. Jennifer Kitson and Makenzie Franco.

About the Artists and Projects

With Corner Store, Amber Art & Design – a team of Philadelphia-based artists that work on public art within marginalized communities that have little or no access to art – explores the contemporary sociological and psychological intersection between pan-ethnic Black and Asian communities in Philadelphia and how relationships are shaped based on which side of the counter we stand. (image top)

Illinois-based artists Ryan Griffis and Sarah Ross are represented by Between the Bottomlands and the World, a video (combining photographs, narrative writing, and moving images) exploring the rural Midwestern town of Beardstown, IL, a place of global exchange and international mobility, inscribed by post-NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) realities.

Brian Holmes, an art and cultural critic with a Ph.D. in Romance Languages has a long-standing interest in neoliberal globalization and a taste for on-the-ground intervention. His online atlas, Living Rivers, is devoted to the Mississippi and Great Lakes watersheds and shows these fluid ecosystems as they are inhabited by a multitude of creatures and radically altered by human enterprise.

Otabenga Jones & Associates, a Houston-based educational art organization, documents a collaborative art project and public health program addressing the ongoing crisis of obesity and its related risks with “The People’s Plate.” Inspired by the Black Panther Free Breakfast for School Children Program, this art project includes a public mural in Houston and programs to kick off a year-long commitment to health education.

Cynthia Main, a multidisciplinary artist from Missouri focuses on relating to the land as part of an integral view of a more sustainable society. She shares her hand-made buckets and barrels created using traditional techniques to readdress storage as one of the current dilemmas of localizing production.

Chicago’s Claire Pentecost uses photography to show how industrial agriculture is only partly about supplying food and how it is structured to meet the problem of expense and excess capital accumulation when considering the cost of complex machinery, brand name chemical herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, fertilizers, and patented seeds.

How Food Moves: Edible Logistics

Philly Stake is a locally-sourced, recurring dinner that raises funds for creative and relevant community engaged projects that contributes to the well-being of Philadelphia’s neighborhoods through community arts, urban agriculture, social services, and activist work.

Stephanie Rothenberg’s Reversal of Fortune: The Garden of Virtual Kinship is a garden in the form of a global map that explores the question of what it means to be charitable through the click of a button and examines the cultural phenomena of online crowd-funded charity and how the flow of money impacts the project, positively and negatively.

How Food Moves: Edible LogisticsStephanie Rothenberg

Candice Smith runs Freedom Arts, an after school collaborative art program at Camden’s Freedom Prep Middle School, which is creating an installation responding to the idea that Camden is a “food desert” and examining the movement of food at their school and in their community.

Philadelphia-based Kristen Neville Taylor’s installation – a globe depicting routes of oranges and actual oranges outfitted with a QR code that links to music, articles, folk tales, and art – was inspired by a lyric from Leonard Cohen’s “Suzanne” (“and she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China”) which she associated with the market place and the movement of food but also romance and exotic foreign cultures.

Admission to the gallery and reception is free and open to the public. 
Free parking is now available in the parking garage on Mick Drive directly across from the gallery. For visitor information go to our website: www.rowan.edu/artgallery.

Thank you to Mary Salvante, Rowan University Art Gallery for the content of this post.

Like Rowan University Art Gallery on facebook

SEO and Photoshop by DoN.

Like DoNArTNeWs Philadelphia Art News Blog on facebook

Follow the new DoNArTNeWs.com

Follow DoN on Twitter @DoNNieBeat58

DoN Brewer on Pinterest

@donniebeat on Instagram

Affiliate Marketing [disclosure page] Shop on-line and help support DoNArTNeWs

Line

Draw the Line, Main Line Art CenterDraw the Line Features Colossal Drawings Addressing the Refugee Experience

2017 Meyer Family Award for Contemporary Art Recipients: Kelley Donahue (Brooklyn, NY), Joanna Platt (Philadelphia, PA) and Paul Santoleri (Philadelphia, PA)

Curated by: Amie Potsic, Executive Director & Chief Curator, Main Line Art Center

March 6 – April 16, 2017

Artist Talks & Opening Reception: Friday, March 10
Artist Talks: 5:30-6:30 pm | Reception: 6:30-8:30 pm

Artist Workshops:

A Twisting Tale of Burning Truths: Wire Sculpture and Soldering Workshop (Adult Workshop)
Joanna Platt | Thursday, April 6, 6:30-9:30 pm

Signs of Life: A Collaborative Drawing & Painting Experience (Family Workshop: 4+ yrs & adult)
Paul Santoleri | Saturday, May 13, 1-3 pm

Main Line Art Center in Haverford is proud to announce Kelley Donahue (Brooklyn, NY), Joanna Platt (Philadelphia, PA) and Paul Santoleri (Philadelphia, PA) as the 2017 recipients of the Meyer Family Award for Contemporary Art. Selected by Members of Main Line Art Center’s Board of Artistic Advisors and Executive Director through a highly competitive application process, Donahue, Platt, and Santoleri will be featured in Draw the Line, the 13th Annual Betsy Meyer Memorial Exhibition, on view at Main Line Art Center March 6 to April 16.

Drawing with ink, clay, and conduit, these artists investigate the permeable borders between internal and external matter, perception, and experience. Accessing both intuition and intellect, drawing and memory are the basis for inquiry. Their videos, installations, and sculptures create new worlds that illuminate and activate our galleries to create seductive narratives, uncanny characters, and immersive environments.

Paul Santoleris impressive work will feature a 12’ x 20’ paper drawing as well as wall, floor, and window works created on site that reference our relationship to nature and the harrowing journey of refugees seeking new homes across seas. Raised in Havertown, Santoleri took drawing classes at Main Line Art Center when he was 13 years old. He now travels extensively to make his work and is represented globally in collections public and private.

Now in its thirteenth year, Main Line Art Center is proud to present an annual exhibition in memory of Teaching Artist Betsy Meyer featuring the work of forward-thinking artists who are pushing boundaries within their artistic practice. As an artist, Betsy exemplified what is most exciting about engaging with the artwork of living artists: watching them experiment with their media and tackling complicated and tough subjects. As a teacher, she encouraged her students to follow her example and expand their practice into new frontiers. And finally, as a member of the board and exhibition committee, she assured that the Art Center was there for the artistic community of Philadelphia.
The Meyer Family Award for Contemporary Art, presented by Main Line Art Center in conjunction with the Betsy Meyer Memorial Exhibition, consists of an award of $1000 and a solo exhibition to each selected artist. This award and associated exhibition program is an effort to support the talented contemporary artists in the region, to honor deserving artists in the field, and to encourage excellence and experimentation in artistic practice, presentation, and community involvement.

Approximately three artists are awarded annually. The 2016 recipients of the Meyer Family Award for Contemporary Art were Matthew Courtney (Philadelphia), Sun Young Kang (Bryn Mawr), Zahra Nazari (New York) whose work was featured in Transformations, presented at Main Line Art Center in Spring 2016. The 2017 finalists are as follows: Rachel Eng (Pennsylvania), Michael Fischerkeller (Maryland), Michael Froio (New Jersey), Jennifer Hecker (New York), Mison Kim (New York), Erica Loustau (Pennsylvania), Thomas Porett (Pennsylvania), and Adrienne Moumin (Maryland).

The Art Center will host artist talks Friday, March 10 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm, followed by a public reception from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. The artist talk, reception and gallery visits are free and open to the public. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 10 am to 8 pm, and Friday through Sunday from 10 am to 4 pm. Each of the artists will also facilitate a workshop on their process during the course of Transformations. For more information about these programs, including registration, visit www.mainlinert.org or call 610.525.0272.

Draw the Line, Main Line Art CenterSelf Creation (as the meaning of life) © Kelley Donahue 2014

Kelley Donahue, originally from northern California, is a ceramic, installation, and performance artist currently based in Brooklyn, NY. Initially interested in drawing and painting, Donahue felt limited by the flat rectangle of the canvas and now constructs three-dimensional canvases of any shape using clay, which she then paints. Donahue earned her B.A. in studio art from Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA, and an M.F.A. in ceramics from Alfred University in Alfred, NY. Donahue has exhibited her work internationally in venues including T+H Gallery in Boston, MA; the Ceramics & Glass Fair in New York, NY; Launch Pad Gallery in Portland, OR; the Museum of Contemporary Art in Montreal, Canada; and Jatiwangi Art Factory in Java, Indonesia. She received the Juror’s Choice Award from Art Centro in Poughkeepsie, NY and the Barbara Rittenberg Fellowship from the Clay Art Center in Port Chester, NY. In addition to her ceramic sculpture and painting, Donahue has collaborated extensively with musicians and video artists to create performances including video projections and sound. Donahue currently teaches ceramics at Jersey City University and maintains a studio practice in Brooklyn, NY.

Draw the Line, Main Line Art CenterPortals © Joanna Platt 2015

Joanna Platt is a Philadelphia-based sculptor whose work deals with the ways our interaction with technology has created new configurations of defined space inside our computers and media devices. She received a B.F.A. from Mason Gross School of the Arts in New Brunswick, NJ and an M.F.A. from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. A member of the gallery collective Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Platt has exhibited her work internationally with shows at Galeria Nacional, in San Jose, Costa Rica; SoHo 20, in NY, NY; Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery in Philadelphia; Grizzly Grizzly in Philadelphia; the Hunterdon Museum of Art in Clinton, NJ; the Old Barracks Museum in Trenton, NJ; The Shore Institute for Contemporary Art in Asbury Park, NJ; and Artist Run at the Satellite Art Fair in Miami. Most recently, she was an invited artist in Artship Olympia at the Seaport Museum in Philadelphia. Platt is an adjunct professor at Camden County College in Blackwood, NJ and a sculpture technician at Independent Casting in Philadelphia.

Draw the Line, Main Line Art CenterOmega Warm Garden © Paul Santoleri 2009. Photo by Lu Szumskyj

Paul DiFuria Santoleri is a muralist based in Philadelphia whose drawing installations and wall-sized paintings can be found in city streets around the world including Philadelphia, Paris, Copenhagen, and Helsinki. Santoleri’s work encompasses a variety of media, but endlessly returns to the stories that can be found in the drawn line: etched on a wall, carved in glass, concrete, wood, ink, obsidian, fresco, or color. His focus on the art of line has led him to create works in a wide diversity of situations around the world, and often in public spaces, like his most recent tile mural installation in the Philadelphia International Airport. A recipient of numerous honors and awards, including grants from The Pollock-Krasner Foundation and The Independence Foundation, Santoleri holds a B.F.A. in painting from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, PA, and an M.F.A. in painting from the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. His work was also included in a monograph published by Criteres Publications in Grenoble, France, which accompanied his first solo show in Paris. Raised in Havertown, Santoleri took drawing classes at Main Line Art Center when he was 13 years old. He now travels extensively to make his work and is represented globally in collections public and private.

Draw the Line, Main Line Art CenterPaul Santoleri in his studio (Philadelphia).  Photo by Amie Potsic 2017

Amie Potsic, curator of Draw the Line, began her tenure as Executive Director & Chief Curator of Main Line Art Center in July of 2012. Prior to that, she served as Director of Gallery 339 and Director of the Career Development Program at the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA) in Philadelphia where she curated exhibitions and planned professional development programming for emerging and professional artists. Potsic has curated over 70 exhibitions at venues including The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and Moore College of Art & Design. Potsic is also an established photographic artist who has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. In addition, she is currently Chair of the Art In City Hall Artistic Advisory Board to the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture & the Creative Economy.

Main Line Art Center is the community’s home to discover, create, and experience visual art. The mission of Main Line Art Center is to inspire and engage people of all ages, abilities, and economic means in visual art through education, exhibitions, and experiences. Committed to increasing the visibility and accessibility of art, the Art Center presents innovative exhibitions and events in the community, including Panorama: Image-Based Art in the 21st Century, a Greater Philadelphia-wide celebration of the photographic image and digital media.

Main Line Art Center’s educational offerings for all ages, abilities, and economic means span from traditional to contemporary, and are all held to the highest level of excellence. In 2015, Main Line Art Center received the Commitment to Cultural Access Award from Art-Reach for the Center’s Accessible Art Programs for children and adults with disabilities, now in their 52nd year. Additionally, the Art Center grants over $12,000 in need-based scholarships annually. Last year, Main Line Art Center engaged 21,000 people through classes, exhibitions, and Summer Art Camp, and touched the lives of over 78,000 through Exhibitions in the Community and festivals across the Philadelphia area.

Thank you to Main Line Art Center for the content of this post.

Like Main Line Art Center on facebook

SEO and Photoshop by DoN.

Like DoNArTNeWs Philadelphia Art News Blog on facebook

Follow the new DoNArTNeWs.com

Follow DoN on Twitter @DoNNieBeat58

DoN Brewer on Pinterest

@donniebeat on Instagram

Affiliate Marketing [disclosure page] Shop on-line and help support DoNArTNeWs

Landlab

Schuylkill Center’s 2017-18 LandLab ResidencyJake Beckman, Landlab

Schuylkill Center’s 2017-18 LandLab Residency in collaboration with the Center for Emerging Visual Artists (CFEVA)

LandLab is a unique artist residency program incorporating artistic creation, ecological restoration and education. LandLab offers resources and space on the Schuylkill Center’s 340-acre wooded property for visual artists to engage audiences in the processes of ecological stewardship through scientific investigation and artistic creation. Offered first in 2014-15, LandLab residents create art-based installations that prevent or remediate environmental damage while raising public awareness about our local ecology.

Schuylkill Center’s 2017-18 LandLab ResidencyWe The Weeds, Zya Levy & Kaitlin Pomerantz, Landlab

The Schuylkill Center is committed to building diversity within our community and expanding access to natural areas to all people, regardless of age, class, race, religion, gender, or ability.  We encourage applications from artists of color, women, trans and gender non-conforming artists, artists with disabilities, and others who may deepen the realm of experience represented in our art community.  Since environmental topics span boundaries of identity as well as divisions of class and accessibility, we are particularly interested in recruiting a diverse pool of applicants for this residency.

CFEVA and the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education invite artists to propose creative projects which operate on the platforms of artistic creation, ecological restoration, and education. Learn more.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 15th, 2017, Apply Now! , $35.00

If you have any particular questions, please contact Julia Fox at the Center for Emerging Visual Artists at Julia@cfeva.org for more information.

SEO and Photoshop by DoN.

Like DoNArTNeWs Philadelphia Art News Blog on facebook

Follow the new DoNArTNeWs.com

Follow DoN on Twitter @DoNNieBeat58

DoN Brewer on Pinterest

@donniebeat on Instagram

Affiliate Marketing [disclosure page] Shop on-line and help support DoNArTNeWs