Tag Archives: Woodmere Art Museum

Gardens

PICTURE-PERFECT GARDENSSet between two flowing fountains and tree-lined pathways, the James A. Michener Art Museum’s Pfundt Sculpture Garden captures the essence of Bucks County’s rolling terrain. Credit: Photo by B. Krist for VISIT PHILADELPHIA®

PHILLY GALLERIES SET THE SCENE FOR PICTURE-PERFECT GARDENS

Art Often Comes With A Side of Floral Beauty In Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA – Throughout the Philadelphia region, art galleries and museums sit amid colorful gardens, quiet woodlands and serene meadows that accentuate the art found in both indoor and outdoor galleries. Here’s a look at some of the region’s museums and attractions that celebrate beauty inside and out:

  • Abington Art Center  This vibrant cultural organization, known for its summer concert series, occupies part of the 27 acres of historic Alverthorpe Manor in Montgomery County. Inside, three galleries show as many as six regional and national art exhibitions annually. Outside, Katasura trees dot a meandering walkway through Sculpture Park, which is open and free to the public 365 days a year. 515 Meetinghouse Road, Jenkintown(215) 887-4882abingtonartcenter.org
  • The Barnes Arboretum & Foundation In suburban Merion, the Barnes Foundation’s 12-acre arboretum is astonishingly diverse for its size, with more than 2,500 varieties of woody and herbaceous plants, many rare. The arboretum opens to visitors May to September. The Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway honors its horticultural legacy with landscaped lawns, trees, park, fountain, contemplative walkways and outdoor seating on its 4.5-acre site. That location’s Garden Restaurant also features outdoor courtyard dining, while internal gardens throughout the building encourage visitors to imagine they are strolling directly into the landscapes they’re admiring on the walls. Arboretum, 300 N. Latch’s Lane, Merion, (215) 278-7200; Foundation, 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway(215) 278-7200barnesfoundation.org  
  • Brandywine River Museum of Art  It takes just one glimpse of the Virginia bluebells, Cardinal flowers and holly and bayberry bushes that border this onetime gristmill to understand why this landscape has served as muse for so many local artists. The Brandywine River Museum is internationally known for its unparalleled collection of works by three generations of Wyeths and its fine collection of American art. Outside, visitors can join guided walks through the wildflower and native plant gardens, which were dedicated by Lady Bird Johnson and, during the annual plant sale on Mother’s Day weekend, can take home seeds cultivated right on the grounds, as well as lovely in-bloom plants. 1 Hoffman’s Mill Road, Chadds Ford(610) 388-2700brandywinemuseum.org  
  • James A. Michener Art Museum This Bucks County destination is home to the Edgar N. Putman Event Pavilion, a 2,700-square-foot indoor-outdoor space designed by architecture firm KieranTimberlake. The pavilion showcases museum programs—jazz nights, lectures, lively family events—within an elegant, all-glass structure that extends into the Patricia Pfundt Sculpture Garden. Inside, the museum’s eight galleries accommodate special exhibitions and a 3,000-piece permanent collection, including many Pennsylvania impressionist paintings that capture the essence of the county’s rolling terrain. 138 S. Pine Street(215) 340-9800, Doylestown, michenerartmuseum.org  
  • Penn Museum – After viewing the impressive collection of international art and artifacts inside this historic University of Pennsylvania museum, visitors can relax in two magnificent gardens. The Warden Garden, now wheelchair accessible, features a classic koi pool, expansive lawns and mosaics created by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The Stoner Courtyard, built on the philosophy that places for nature are necessary in our built-up world, includes sculptural pieces by A.S. Calder, a cobblestone walkway and a beautiful marble fountain. Inside, guests marvel at ancient objects including African and Native American masks, Maya sculpture and Egyptian mummies. 3260 South Street(215) 898-4000penn.museum
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art Best known for its international exhibitions and world-renowned collections of more than 240,000 works, the crown jewel of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway is more than a museum. It’s also the unofficial gateway to Fairmount Park. The museum’s bi-level sculpture garden, with its combination of terraces, lawns, flora and water features, showcases an ever-changing sculpture collection overlooking Fairmount Park, the Schuylkill River, the four-acre Azalea Garden and the grand, neoclassical Fairmount Water Works. Works on display include large-scale pieces by Claes Oldenburg Ellsworth Kelly and Sol LeWitt. 2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway(215) 763-8100philamuseum.org
  • Rodin Museum Movie-theater magnate, philanthropist and Rodin collector Jules Mastbaum, known for his eye for elegance, hired architects Paul Cret and Jacques Gréber to create this jewel-box museum. The venue’s intimate settings are perfect for taking in the extensive Rodin collection, one of the greatest single collections of his work outside Paris. Visitors seem to enjoy the front garden’s reflecting pool and tapestry of magnolia trees, shrubs and colorful flowers—some dating back to the 1920s—as much as they do The Thinker and Eternal Springtime. 2151 Benjamin Franklin Parkway(215) 763-8100rodinmuseum.org  
  • Second Bank of the United States – Inside this Parthenon-like structure is a first-rate collection of approximately 200 historic portraits of Founding Fathers, early leaders, explorers and others, many by Charles Willson Peale. Just steps away are several gardens. The Signers’ Garden, with native plants and trees, commemorates the creators of Declaration of the Independence. The 18th-Century Garden replicates formal English gardens of the day with geometrically patterned raised flowerbeds, walking paths, and a pergola. The Rose Garden and Magnolia Garden are secluded, colorful and fragrant refuges. Second Bank, 420 Chestnut Street; Signers’, 5th & Chestnut Streets; 18th-Century, Walnut Street between 3rd & 4th Streets; Rose and Magnolia, Locust Street between 4th & 5th Streets; (215) 965-2305nps.gov/inde  
  • Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library Textiles, paintings, prints, furniture and ceramics dating from 1640 to 1860 make the former home of Henry Francis du Pont a favorite for fans of Americana. Nature enthusiasts are drawn to the 60-acre garden nestled in the 1,000-acre country estate. Highlights of the garden include eight acres of azaleas, naturalized bulbs displays, peonies and primroses. Trails lead from the garden through rolling meadow, woodlands and waterways. If the kids get antsy, a short trip across the Troll Bridge leads to the Faerie Cottage in the Enchanted Woods. 5105 Kennett Pike, Winterthur, Delaware(800) 448-3883winterthur.org
  • Woodmere Art Museum – At the top of the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, this gem of a venue tells stories of Philadelphia’s art and artists, including N.C. Wyeth, Benjamin West and Violet Oakley, as well as new and emerging contemporary artists. The 19th-century stone Victorian mansion sits on six acres dotted with sculptures by Dina Wind and other Philadelphia-area artists surrounding Harry Bertoia’s sinuous fountain sculpture, Free Interpretation of Plant Forms9201 Germantown Avenue(215) 247-0476woodmereartmuseum.org

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156th

156th Anniversary Gala, Philadelphia Sketch Club

Dear Philadelphia Sketch Club Members & Friends:

The Philadelphia Sketch Club will be hosting its 156th Anniversary Gala on October 15, 2016, and will be honoring three of the nationʼs top artists. The Gala will feature a live art auction, silent auction, hors dʼoeuvres and dinner buffet, cocktails, and music. Black tie, business or creative attire are acceptable. The Gala brings together our members, patrons, supporters, friends, sponsors, neighbors as well as businesses like you, for an evening of celebration to support the Philadelphia Sketch Club.

We invite you to help us make the 2016 Gala a smashing success by participating in our event. By doing so, you will be able to contribute to the vibrancy of our neighborhood by supporting our local cultural community and target new customers.

You can participate by:

• MAKING A DONATION TO THE SILENT AUCTION and/or

• ADVERTISING IN THE PROGRAM BOOK and/or

• BECOMING A SPONSOR (at the $1000 or higher level)

Founded in 1860 the Philadelphia Sketch Club is the oldest artists club in America. We have more than 275 members, young and venerable, accomplished and burgeoning artists, as well as dedicated volunteers, and patrons of the arts that come to our historic headquarters to draw, paint, print, socialize, and support the arts. By supporting the 2016 Gala, you will help us grow our educational programs, workshops and community outreach. Your contribution will enrich the cultural profile of the Club and artistic community.

Please visit www.sketchclub.org for more information and instructions on how to join our effort, or call me at 267-664- 2434. You can also email any questions to bpatterson2045@comcast.net. Iʼll be pleased to help you with any of the information for the benefits outlined in the enclosures. Thank you for your participation in, and support of thePhiladelphia Sketch Club‘s 156th Anniversary Gala.

The Philadelphia Sketch Club will be hosting its 156th Anniversary Gala on Saturday, October 15, 2016. One of the highlights of the event is that we will be honoring three of the nation’s top artists, Jan Baltzell, Eileen Goodman and Cindi Ettinger. We will be presenting each with the Philadelphia Sketch Club Medal for their significant achievements in the visual arts. This will be a fun and highly visible event. It will bring together our members, patrons, supporters, friends, sponsors and neighbors. It will feature a live art auction, silent auction, hors d’oeuvres, buffet dinner, cocktails and music. It is critical that this event be a success as it is a significant fund raising vehicle for the Club.

As a member or friend of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, you can make our event a success by putting some thought into how you can help with this effort. You can participate by:

• Purchasing tickets for you and a guest(s).

• Encouraging you friends to purchase tickets and attend. Ticket may be purchased on our website (sketchclub.org) or you can give us their names and addresses and we will make sure they are sent an invitation.

• Contact a friend or business that may donate an item to our silent auction. Donors of silent auction items will be recognized in our program booklet.

• Contact an individual or business that would place an ad in our program booklet.

• Contribute an additional donation to the Gala fund. Any support of $1,000 or more will get sponsor recognition in the program booklet.

We have the backing of many important members of the artistic community. Members of our Honorary Gala Committee include David R. & Holly Trostle Brigham (David is President and CEO of PAFA and Holly is an Artist); William R. Valerio, Director & CEO, Woodmere Art Museum; Lisa Tremper Hanover, Director & CEO, James A. Michener Art Museum; John & Cindy Affleck (John is President of Woodmere Art Museum‘s Board of Trustees and a second generation Philadelphia Sketch Club Member whose father, Ralph Affleck, was President of the PSC in 1951/52); Bill Scott, Artist & Member of Philadelphia Sketch Club‘s Board of Trustees; Christopher Schmidt, Artist & Director of the Schmidt Dean Gallery; Dorothy J. del Bueno, Member of Woodmere Art Museum‘s Board and Collections Committee; Sharon Ewing, Director of Gross McCleaf Gallery; Stephen Tarantal, Interim Provost and Professor Emeritus, the University of the Arts; Sally Bellet, Board Member at Woodmere Art Museum and Drexel University; Karen Lightner, Head of the Art & Literature Departments at the Free Library of Philadelphia; and David Weiss, Vice President at Freeman’s Auction, a specialist on the Antiques Roadshow and guest auctioneer for the Gala auction.

The event will be a fun affair where you can socialize with Philadelphia Sketch Club members, members of the Honorary Gala Committee and the three honorees; enjoy the food and beverages and perhaps win one of the eight or so artworks that will be part of our live auction. The auction items will be posted on our website at a later date. Your help to market this year’s Gala is greatly appreciated. If you have any questions or need more information, please contact me.

Best regards,

Bill Patterson, Chair, 156th Anniversary GalaPhiladelphia Sketch Club235 S. Camac St., Philadelphia, PA 19107

bpatterson2045@comcast.net

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Chromography

Chromography, Rowan University Art Gallery CHROMOGRAPHY: WRITING IN COLOR

Translating communication symbols & systems into color, sound and objects Glassboro, NJ – Rowan University Art Gallery presents Chromography: Writing in Color, a two-person exhibition examining concepts of translation and symbol-based communication, from March 23 – May 9. A reception on Thursday, April 9 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. features an artist’s talk beginning at 6:00 p.m. to include a performance of excerpts from musical translations represented in the exhibit.

Artists Melinda Steffy and Gerard Brown explore concepts of translation and symbol-based communication in their work. Starting with different sets of symbols—Steffy with music and Brown with writing—both artists have developed systems for translating distinct methods of communication into visual artworks. Written texts, then, rely on color and pattern to be understood. Music, usually experienced as linear and time-based, can be seen all at once, in immediate spatial configurations. Gerard Brown explores the intersection of seeing and reading, often by employing codes that do not—at first glance—resemble writing. Brown employs a script of nautical signal flags arranged according to traditional “tumbling block” pattern similar to quilting patterns. The tumbling block pattern is a powerful optical illusion that creates the feeling of three-dimensional space on a flat plane. This illusion offers an analog to the ways writing can be confused with speech. Unlike most other forms of writing, signal flags rely on color to communicate their message and are easily confused with one another if color is absent. Converting the common alphabet into a patterned array of color reveals idiosyncratic instances in language, as letterforms repeat and combine into new shapes and arrangements.

Melinda Steffy explores congruent patterns by translating compositions by J.S. Bach and Béla Bartók into watercolor paintings on paper. In her translations, each of the notes of the chromatic scale corresponds with a hue on the color wheel; as the music progresses through the key signatures, the paintings’ color schemes shift. Notes and rhythms are plotted on a grid to show intrinsic tonal and rhythmic structures. The subtle irregularity of the hand-painted squares and watercolor pigments captures a sense of tone variation similar to a live performance.

A central element of this exhibition is “The Hours,” an elaborate experiment in translation that moves messages from writing to music to image. Working with “Solresol,” a language invented by composer and violinist François Sudre (1787 – 1862), the seven notes of the musical scale: DO RE ME FA SO LA TI are used to translate texts. Each word in Solresol uses one to four syllables (or notes), resulting in a lexicon of about 3,000 terms. Sudre constructed dictionaries to translate French, English, and other European tongues into his new language, and created systems of notation – including one that assigns colors to notes – by which it could be written. In this manner, colored flags or lights could transit messages. Brown translated short literary descriptions of times of day into the Solresol language and then into brief melodies that chime at the hours they describe. For example, a passage about the end of the day from Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” becomes a lonely, meandering melody for brass ensemble. Each tune was then re-scored by Steffy, using the system she invented that translates musical notes into color. Several of these visualizations are installed on the gallery windows as decals, and each of them sounds at its designated time in the public space outside the gallery. In the gallery, “The Hours” are presented in the books where the passages originated.

Gerard Brown, a writer and painter, is an Assistant Professor at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. His work explores how the mind moves from seeing to reading by concealing writing in patterns and color. His paintings and drawings have been exhibited at the Woodmere Art Museum, Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia Sculpture Gym, and the Icebox (all in Philadelphia), as well as Finlandia University Art Gallery (Michigan) and 5.4.7 Art Center (Kansas). He has also organized exhibits for the Center for Art in Wood (Philadelphia) and Hicks Art Center at Bucks County Community College.

Melinda Steffy, a visual artist and classically-trained musician from Philadelphia, has had artwork displayed across the Northeast and beyond, including the Icebox, the Hall at the Crane Arts Building, and Sam Quinn Gallery (Philadelphia); Delaware Center for Contemporary Art and Fringe Wilmington (Delaware); Lancaster Museum of Art and Villanova University (Pennsylvania); Finlandia University (Michigan); Micro Museum (New York); and Stamford Art Association (Connecticut). She is an artist member of InLiquid and a LEADERSHIP Philadelphia fellow. An accomplished musician, Steffy currently serves as general manager for the innovative music nonprofit LiveConnections and sings with the Chestnut Street Singers.

Admission to the gallery, talk and reception is free and open to the public. Regular gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 10 am to 5 pm (with extended hours on Wednesdays to 7 pm); and Saturday, 12 to 5

Rowan University Art Gallery is located on the lower level of Westby Hall on the university campus, Route 322 in Glassboro, NJ. Directions can be found on the gallery or university websites. For more information, call 856-256-4521 or visit www.rowan.edu/artgallery.

This program is made possible in part with funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

Rowan University Art Gallery

Mary Salvante, Gallery & Exhibitions Program Director

CONTACT: Dennis Dougherty (856) 256-4537

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Active Adults

Marilyn Lavins, Bernice Paul and Priscilla BohlenActive Adults: Marilyn Lavins, Bernice Paul and Priscilla Bohlen at Center on the Hill, 8855 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 19118

Three visual artists will be showing their paintings at Center on the Hill…the place for active adults. This art show runs from December 2nd until Dec. 29th 2014 and can be viewed for no charge at any time during ‘Center on the Hill’ business hours: Monday through Friday, 9:00am until 4:00pm.

Marilyn Lavins has recently had her ‘Water Works‘ painting selected for the cover of the Surrey Services 2015 calendar. Lavins was awarded first place by Richard Rosenfeld, at Einstein Hospital in Elkins Park, for her collage necklace made from a coat hanger, pearls, silver, and copper. Marilyn has won many prizes and has shown throughout this area. Marilyn Lavins has a BFA degree from Tyler School of Art, has studied at Moore College of Art and Design, and at The Barnes Foundation in Merion with Violetta de Mazia and with Angelo Pinto

Bernice Paul is 97, still painting, and still showing her work. She emigrated with her family, to the US from Moscow, in 1929, at age 12. She has studied art extensively at PAFAThe Barnes Foundation, Fleisher Art Memorial, and The Philadelphia Sketch ClubBernice’s work has been shown at Woodmere Art Museum, Villanova University, Rosemont College, Inliquid, The Philadelphia Art Alliance, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Crane ArtsBernice Paul’s vibrant style has earned many awards; Best in Show at Main Line Art Center and also at Tri-State Artists Equity Association, for her “exciting composition and the physicality and joy of her brush strokes.”

Priscilla Bohlen is a professional visual artist who works on canvas using acrylic paint, with resist. Bohlen applies the resist to a colorful background, then with a palette knife, she covers it all with a complementary color. When the resist is removed, part of the underneath activity is revealed. From there Priscilla enjoys the challenge of resolving the painting, which involves many layers. Priscilla Bohlen loves the surprise element that comes about through this method of painting. Priscilla is a juried member of Delaware Valley Art League, of ARTsisters, and of Tri-State Artists Equity AssociationBohlen is actively involved with the workings of all three groups, when she is not painting.

Center on the Hill…the place for active adults“, is a vital outreach center. The director, Leslie Lefer has worked to build the center to its current level of excellence. Be sure to visit this gem of an outreach center, right here in Chestnut Hill at 8855 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 19118. You may want to sign up for an exercise class, or listen to a speaker. For more information, call 215.247.4654 or email Llefer@chestnuthillpres.org.

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